First of its kind heart transplant saves NE man


OMAHA, Neb. (WOWT) – A Nebraska man is living and breathing with a new heart today, a heart that was brought back to life and transplanted to replace his own. It’s a groundbreaking procedure doctors at Nebraska Medical Center successfully completed.

It’s called donation after cardiac death, according to doctors at Nebraska Medical Center. The heart actually stops beating. However, through their procedure they’re able to revive it so someone else can live.

The procedure involves connecting the donor to a machine. The machine apparently restores circulation to the heart and other organs while the organs remain inside the donor. According to the study, Doctors at Nebraska Medical Center used this method to transplant four organs, including a heart, for the first time on January 3, 2021.

It’s the first time this specific method was used for a heart transplant in the state of Nebraska.

“The technique used to recover the heart is unique and has only been performed in a very few cases around the world and in only one other center in the United States (NYU),” Cardiothoracic Surgeon Marian Urban, MD, PhD explained.

Urban explained the technique allows them to restore the blood flow through the heart before it undergoes irreversible damage. It’s been successful for saving kidneys and the liver as well.

The ability to recover organs after “cardiac death” would up the donor pool by 30 percent, according to researchers.

Don Sheard (70) of Elmwood is living proof it works.

Sheard has relied on an LVAD (Left Ventricular Assist Device) for the last three years to keep his heart pumping. He said he “was running out of time,” and agreed he would be willing to accept a recovered heart, knowing it could move him up on the donor list.

Now for the first time, his heart beats without the help of batteries.

“I just woke up like I was awakened. I reached for my batteries to change them since I had been under and then I realized, they were gone. The feeling I have now is I can, I can live,” Sheard said.

With his new heart, he added he’ll be able to keep up with his wife of 33 years, four children and nine grandchildren for many more years.

Copyright 2021 WOWT. All rights reserved.



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Man to give away two tickets to NFC Championship


DEVASTATED. REPORTER IT IS A MATCHUP FOR THE AGES. AARON RODGERS VERSUS TOM BRADY. WEDNESDAY, SOME 11,000 SEASON TICKET HOLDERS SCRAMBLED ON TICKETMASTER FOR THE AVAILABLE 6500. THEY SOLD OUT IN 40 MINUTES. >> HOW UPSET ARE YOU? I CANNOT BEGIN TO TELL YOU. THIS IS THE FIRST TIME IN 75 YEARS THAT I HAVE BEEN DENIED BEING AT A PLAYOFF GAME. REPORTER: THIS 85-YEAR-OLD WOMAN SAYS HER BROTHER WAS ON THE SITE READY TO GO WITH HIS SPECIAL ACCESS CODE THAT WAS UNSUCCESSFUL. MANY FANS BLAMING IT ON TECHNICAL ISSUES. >> IT IS HEARTBREAKING. ANGRY AND FRUSTRATED. >> I’M LIKE — 1400 IN THE QUEUE . ALL OF A SUDDEN, I WAS THERE. I THANK GOD THAT I DID. I HIT PAYPAL. AND IT COMES UP AND SAYS — YOU HAVE YOUR TICKETS. REPORTER: STEVE EWING OF MILWAUKEE MANAGED TO GET TWO. YOU ARE GOING TO GIVE THEM AWAY? >> I’M LOOKIN FOR PEOPLE THAT REALLY ARE DESERVING. REPORTER: H SAYS HE HAS GIVEN AWAY 23 PLAYOFF TICKETS TO STRANGER SINCE 2015. BUT THIS YEAR, TICKETS ARE NONTRANSFERABLE AND CANNOT BE RESOLD. THERE IS ONLY ONE WAY IN AND THAT IS WITH STEVE’S ACTUAL PHONE AND THAT IS EXACTLY WHAT HE PLANS TO DO. >> I’M GOING TO GIVE MY PHONE TO SOMEONE. HE WILL BE ABLE TO WATCH PROBABLY THE BEST NFL GAME. REPORTER MEANWHILE, SHE WILL TRY TO ENJOY THE GAME FROM HER COUCH. >> IT WILL BE THE SAME. — IT WON’T BE THE SAME. REPORTER: BUT SHE SAYS A WIN WILL MAKE IT EASIER. PATRICK: THE PACKERS SAY

Milwaukee man to give away two tickets to NFC Championship

Only way to get into Lambeau for game will be with Steve Ewing’s phone

It’s a matchup for the ages: Aaron Rodgers versus Tom Brady in Sunday’s NFC Championship game in Green Bay. On Wednesday, some 11,000 season ticketholders scrambled on Ticketmaster for the available 6,500 tickets available. They sold out in 40 minutes.”This is the first time in 75 years that I’ve been denied being at a playoff game,” said 85-year-old Fritzie Neitzel, of Green Bay. She said her brother was on the site ready to go with his special access code but was unsuccessful. Many fans blame the problems on technical issues.”It’s heartbreaking, angry, frustrating,” Fritzie said. “I’m like 1,400 in the queue and then it works all the way down, and all of the sudden, I’m there, and holy mackerel. Then I hit Paypal, and all the sudden, it comes up boom, you got your tickets,” said Steve Ewing of Milwaukee. He managed to buy two tickets, but he doesn’t plan to go to the game. “You were going to get these tickets and give them away?” WISN 12 News reporter Hillary Mintz asked.”I’m looking for really, really deserving people that really deserve the tickets much more than me,” Ewing said. Ewing said he’s given away 23 playoff tickets to strangers since 2015.But this year, with Packers COVID-19 rules, tickets are non-transferable and cannot be resold. The Packers said there are no exceptions.There’s only one way into Lambeau, and that’s with Ewing’s phone. “(I’m) gonna give my phone to somebody and a free pass into Lambeau, and they’ll be able to watch probably the best NFL game since the Ice Bowl,” Ewing said. Meanwhile, Fritzie will try to enjoy the game from her couch, but it won’t be the same. But she said a Packer win would make everything all right.The Packers said they’re looking into complaints with Ticketmaster and the purchasing process, but said it may have been the result of high demand.

It’s a matchup for the ages: Aaron Rodgers versus Tom Brady in Sunday’s NFC Championship game in Green Bay.

On Wednesday, some 11,000 season ticketholders scrambled on Ticketmaster for the available 6,500 tickets available. They sold out in 40 minutes.

“This is the first time in 75 years that I’ve been denied being at a playoff game,” said 85-year-old Fritzie Neitzel, of Green Bay.

She said her brother was on the site ready to go with his special access code but was unsuccessful. Many fans blame the problems on technical issues.

“It’s heartbreaking, angry, frustrating,” Fritzie said.

“I’m like 1,400 in the queue and then it works all the way down, and all of the sudden, I’m there, and holy mackerel. Then I hit Paypal, and all the sudden, it comes up boom, you got your tickets,” said Steve Ewing of Milwaukee.

He managed to buy two tickets, but he doesn’t plan to go to the game.

“You were going to get these tickets and give them away?” WISN 12 News reporter Hillary Mintz asked.

“I’m looking for really, really deserving people that really deserve the tickets much more than me,” Ewing said.

Ewing said he’s given away 23 playoff tickets to strangers since 2015.

But this year, with Packers COVID-19 rules, tickets are non-transferable and cannot be resold. The Packers said there are no exceptions.

There’s only one way into Lambeau, and that’s with Ewing’s phone.

“(I’m) gonna give my phone to somebody and a free pass into Lambeau, and they’ll be able to watch probably the best NFL game since the Ice Bowl,” Ewing said.

Meanwhile, Fritzie will try to enjoy the game from her couch, but it won’t be the same. But she said a Packer win would make everything all right.

The Packers said they’re looking into complaints with Ticketmaster and the purchasing process, but said it may have been the result of high demand.



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Free 'sled library' provides recreational opportunity


Library available in La Crosse’s Myrick Park

LA CROSSE, Wis. (WKBT) – A free ‘sled library’ is now available in Myrick Park.

As the name suggests, the sleds are free for kids to use and return while sledding in the park.

The library is just a way to make sure that all kids can enjoy playing outdoors in the winter.

“Nature’s not canceled. We can still go outside in the winter. We need more reasons than ever to find a way to love being outside,” said Hike It Baby branch ambassador Laura Miller.

The library and sleds inside were donated on behalf of our La Crosse branch of ‘Hike it Baby’, a nonprofit focused on outdoor recreation for young kids.



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Students make sculptures for hospital residents


Do you want to build a snowman? National Honor Society students at Cloquet High School have said yes to the challenge.

CLOQUET, Minn. – Do you want to build a snowman? National Honor Society students at Cloquet High School have said yes to the challenge.

After a wild 2020, staff at the Sunnyside healthcare center in Cloquet were looking for a little pick-me-up for all the people living there.

“Just trying to think of something to help put a smiles on the residents faces with them being stuck where they are or in their rooms,” Community Memorial Hospital Volunteer Coordinator, Deanna Johnson says.

And a group of National Honor Society members from the Cloquet high school answered the call.

“It helps the NHS students as well because they need volunteer hours,” Johnson says.

With their normal volunteering opportunities being cut down this year because of the pandemic, this seemed like the perfect opportunity.

“It’s kind of a win-win for students and residents,” Johnson says.

The residents looked on while the students worked.

“I think it’s great, I really do,” Sunnyside Resident, Andy Coathup says.

Giving the honor society students a chance to lift the spirits for many in a time when people need it the most.

“I don’t know with COVID and everything it can get kind of lonely, especially with not a lot of visitors and stuff, so maybe it’s just a little something to will brighten their day,” said Sadie Senich, a junior at Cloquet High School. “They can look at it when they feel sad or lonely or just need something to look at out the window.”

There were a little more than a dozen students participating in the building of snowmen and snow sculptures.



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Doctor saves lives from his living room


Dr. Steven Brown, of Mercy’s Virtual Care Center, monitors patients in ICUs across the country

ST. LOUIS COUNTY, Mo. — We’ve talked a lot about the frontline healthcare workers inside our hospitals, but did you know there are doctors working remotely to save lives? Dr. Steven Brown with Mercy hospitals is one of those heroes. He lives in Chesterfield, but every night he logs into dozens of ICUs across the country.

“I’m able to access patient medical records, including the laboratory tests and the notes by the doctors and nurses and respiratory therapists. I have complete video camera capability with cameras that are so sophisticated, I can zoom into the level of a hair follicle,” Dr. Brown explained.

Almost every day since the pandemic began, he logs onto a four-screen hub in his living room to monitor critical care patients at hospitals across the country.

“I’m taking care of about 100 people a night, mostly on ventilators, mostly with COVID. Half of them are younger than me and they go down into the 20s at this point,” he explained.

Dr. Brown is 65 and is an attending physician with Mercy’s Virtual Care Center. He estimates he’s treated well over 1,000 patients in the last 10 months.

“Interactions have been challenging dealing with patients, many of whom are dying on me with every shift, sometimes multiple times per night,” he said.

Dr. Brown is in constant communication with respiratory therapists, nurses and doctors on-site. He monitors patient heart rates and oxygen saturation levels. He studies X-rays, and when needed, he can video remote into the ICUs.

In his four decades in practice, this pandemic has by far been the most challenging.

“I mean, this is all my experience. The past 40 years has prepared me for this pandemic, including working in New York City during the AIDs epidemic in the 80’s,” he said.

Dr. Brown has doubled his hours in the last 10 months and has put his retirement on hold. Still, he said he is not the hero.

“The heroes are the people who are staying home, who are doing the best they can to wear their masks and to distance. Those are the people who are really the heroes that are going to bring this pandemic to an end and the vaccinations,” he said.



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Columbus man wins lottery twice in two months


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DoorDash donation kicks off restaurant relief fund


The Connecticut Restaurant Association (CRA) announced Thursday that it has partnered with the DoorDash delivery app to launch a fund to help struggling food businesses. 

San Francisco-based DoorDash will contribute $500,000 to get the fund started, according to the CRA, part of the company’s $10 million national grant program.

“In the midst of historically challenging times for local restaurants, DoorDash’s contribution to the Connecticut Restaurant Relief Fund will provide much needed financial support for local businesses throughout our state,” said CRA Executive Director Scott Dolch. 

Restaurants can apply to the fund starting Jan. 25 at www.ctrestaurantrelief.org for one-time, $5,000 grants. Awards will be based on available funds and are limited to one per restaurant group.

Third-party delivery providers like DoorDash and Uber Eats have been criticized by some restaurant owners as prohibitively expensive, wiping out profits and controlling customer data.

Amid rising controversy about the role of delivery apps during the pandemic, DoorDash announced this fall that it would launch a $200 million, five-year effort to support restaurants and delivery staff nationwide.
 



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Shipyard 'coming back to life' after hard times


PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — For those looking for a job, there could be an option on the horizon. The iconic Philly Shipyard has been almost idle for the last few years, but the Shipyard is coming back to life and bringing hundreds of jobs back to South Philadelphia.

It’s completely empty today but not for long. The Philly Shipyard is revving back to full speed.

With a skeleton crew, the Philly Shipyard is prepping for its newly secured contract.

“I’m all about getting people back in my yard,” Philly Shipyard CEO Steinar Nerbovik said.

Struggling to find new orders for the past two years, the CEO had to lay off the majority of his employees.

“We went from 1,200 workers down to 100,” Nerbovik said.

They’re now back to about 200. They started cutting steel back in December.

Eyewitness News cameras were allowed inside to capture workers now sandblasting and applying primer.

“We’ll sandblast, we’ll prime. We’ll get everything in production for them, where it goes over to the machines over there where they burn it, they mill it all for production,” Steve Drunn, a supervisor, said.

Philly Shipyard’s quality and safety record has secured them a maritime contract to build four of the next generation of Maritime Academy ships to replace currently outdated ships.

“There will be space for 600 cadets onboard and 100 officers,” Nerbovik said.

Nerbovik said they need to hire another 500 workers this year and another 500 next year.

“Finance people, engineers, planners, purchasing people but most of all, production people,” Nerbovik said.

Like shipbuilders and welders.

“It’s really great to see the Shipyard coming back to life,” one worker said.

Laborers will build for this year and next. The first ship is expected to be delivered in spring 2023 and every six months after that until the contract is complete.

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