Today’s top Black Friday 2022 deals: Apple, Dyson and more


Want more deals? Visit CNN Underscored’s Guide to Black Friday for wall-to-wall coverage of the best discounts to be found during the biggest shopping event of the year.

Keeping track of all the incredible Black Friday deals popping up is a full-time job in and of itself — in fact, it’s our full-time job! While you get your shopping on, the Underscored team will be keeping track of all the deals you need to know about on the web, and here, we’ll be calling out our 10 favorites for each day leading up to Black Friday and Cyber Monday.

This post will be your guide to the best of the best, the most impressive savings on the most coveted items.

The LG C2 OLED is one of our favorite TVs, offering incredible picture quality and a snappy interface. It’s currently at its lowest price yet.

One of the best deals on Dyson you’ll see all day, you can get the Dyson V8, plus a fluffy cleaning head for hard floors and three extra cleaning accessories that’ll make this your new favorite toy.

The AirPods Pro 2 are our favorite Apple earbuds, thanks to their stellar noise cancellation and controls, and they’re currently at their lowest-ever price.

Smart garage controllers give you an easy way to double-check the door or remotely close it via your smartphone or smart home setup. Our editors’ favorite model, the Chamberlain MyQ, is an excellent value for a gadget that’ll give you reliable peace of mind.

With two hours of battery life, customizable speed, an ergonomic handle and four easy-to-clean attachments, this massage gun is ideal for the average user. Get it now for more than $100 off, its all-time low price.

If you prefer a bowl-lift mixer because it feels sturdier, the KitchenAid Professional 600 Series is a solid upgrade option from the Artisan series. It has a bigger stainless steel bowl and a more powerful motor that can handle bigger batches and recipes.

The Beats Fit Pro blend all of the AirPods Pro’s best features with a stylish, secure and workout-friendly design. With a great discount and Underscored’s seal of approval, why not try them out?

Brighten your smile in no time with this set of Crest Whitestrips — this pack includes 22 treatments plus a bonus 1 Hour Express treatment to last you a year or more.

The improved Thermapen One was the fastest and most accurate thermometer we tested, and had the easiest-to-read display. If you’re serious about your cooking, then it’s worth the (newly lowered) price.



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7 best AirPods Pro 2 cases in 2022


Apple’s $249 AirPods Pro 2 haven’t been out for long, but we’re already seeing cases that are designed to help protect the new charging case, all while still letting you take advantage of the new lanyard loop and speaker.

Apple made it possible to locate your second-generation AirPods Pro if you lose the wireless earbuds themselves, the charging case or both, but protecting your purchase from accidental drops and scratches is still up to you.

Below you’ll find our top picks for cases to help you keep your AirPods Pro safe and sounding good as well as a bonus lanyard pick so that you never lose your new buds.

$29.99 $18.99 at Amazon

Spigen Ultra Hybrid Case

Spigen’s AirPods Pro 2 Ultra Hybrid case is completely clear and comes with a circular carabiner for easy attachment to your belt loop or a hook inside your backpack. There’s still a cutout for the new lanyard loop on the AirPods Pro 2 case, and according to Spigen’s website, the case will still work with wireless chargers.

$18.99 at Amazon

Spigen Rugged Armor Case

Looking for something a little more rugged than the Ultra Hybrid? The Spigen Rugged Armor AirPods Pro case looks a lot like Spigen’s Rugged Armor case for the iPhone 14, only smaller. The Rugged Armor comes in black and has a matching carabiner. The case is a combination of plastic and silicon that should bring more than enough protection to your AirPods Pro.

From $29.90 at Dbrand

Dbrand Grip Case

Dbrand is known primarily for its skins that offer minimal protection but plenty of personalization. However, Dbrand’s AirPods Pro 2 case looks amazing. It has military-grade impact resistance but isn’t overly bulky, and comes with something that every AirPods Pro case should have: a built-in removal tool. I’m always afraid I’m going to break the case, my AirPods or both when trying to take a case off. Oh, and you can still pick your own design to spice up the case’s look.

$24.95 at Speck

Speck Presidio Clear Case

Speck’s Presidio Clear case will ensure you can still see your engraved AirPods Pro charging case while still adding a layer of protection. Don’t bother with getting your own lanyard for the new charging case, as Speck didn’t provide a cutout for it. However, there’s a clip on the case that you can use in its place.

$24.95 at Speck

Speck Presidio with Soft-Touch Coating Case

The Speck Presidio case with a soft-touch coating comes in black, although the listing calls it black with bright silver. Nonetheless, the exterior of the case has a coating that makes it smooth and soft to the touch. One downside is that it appears the case doesn’t have a cutout for the charging case’s lanyard loop, but it does include a carabiner of its own that should suffice.

$15.99 at Amazon

Elago Clear Case

For something that’s even more affordable, check out the Elago Clear Case. For $16, you’ll get the clear case and an adhesive strip that’s used to hold the top of the case to your AirPods Pro’s charging case. It’s a minimal case that will definitely get the job done, and there’s nothing wrong with that.

$12.95 at Apple

Incase Lanyard

Apple only lists a single accessory for the second-generation AirPods Pro on its website, and it’s not a case. Instead, it’s the Incase Lanyard that looks like a fantastic option to keep your AirPods Pro connected to your backpack or just give you something to hold onto during a workout. The clip-on the lanyard makes it easy to attach the lanyard to things like a belt loop or backpack and then remove it without much fuss. If you don’t get a case (or are using a model with a cutout like the Spigen and Elago options above), the lanyard is a wise choice.



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Anticipatory Grief – All There Is with Anderson Cooper



I spent much of this past weekend, as usual, in my basement, going through boxes from my mom’s apartment. Saturday night, when my kids were asleep, I decided to try and wade through as much stuff as I could. I started around 8:30 p.m. and when I next looked at my phone it was almost 1 a.m.. I try to stop on a high note too, when I found a bunch of my mom’s paintbrushes, I called it a night. They’re probably the things that remind me of her the most. They smell like turpentine and paint. It’s the smell of every studio she ever had. And I just think it’s amazing how a smell can bring you back and bring you to tears. In the same box. I found a picture of a birthday party for my brother Carter. He was maybe four years old. He and my mom are in the foreground of the photo, but in the background there’s this blurry image of one of the most important people in my life. Though I’ve never really talked much about her publicly.

Her name is May McLinden. She hated being photographed, so there aren’t a ton of pictures of her. Mae was my nanny from the time I was born till I was about 15. But she was much more than that. She was a mom to me, as important to me as my mom and my dad. And she still is. Even though she died after a ten year struggle with dementia in 2014. May was from Scotland, near Glasgow. She didn’t suffer fools gladly, but she was funny and loving and our bond was extraordinary. She lived with us and after my dad died, she was the person I could depend on more than anyone. May took care of me when I was little, but she’s also the one who taught me to take care of myself, to not sit around, to make decisions, and to make things happen. As a kid, every night before I fell asleep, I would pray that one day I would make enough money to take care of May and get her a house and take her on trips to places that she always wanted to visit. As often happens with parents nannies. My mom was hurt by the closeness of my relationship with May, and one day she fired her without any warning. I came home and May was packing her things, trying not to cry in front of me. It was awful. May was 60 years old and I was her son. She was a mom to me, and there was nothing she or I could do.

May and I remained extremely close for the next 32 years of her life. We met for meals. We talked on the phone. Eventually, she retired and moved back to Scotland. When I started to earn some money, we took trips together to Los Angeles, Edinburgh, Rome. Over the years, I saved up to surprise her with a house of her own. But by the time I could do it, May had begun to decline. When she was around 80, her hearing got a lot worse than it already had been, and phone calls became difficult. I’d ask May how she was, but she usually dismissed my questions, preferring instead to hear about what I was doing, what my friends, many of whom she knew, were up to. If I was happy, May was happy, and I wanted to make her happy more than anything else in the world. May started mentioning occasionally that she was taking care of a baby. She had nieces and nephews, and I figured as one of their grandkids, but I didn’t ask more. Then a couple of weeks went by and I couldn’t reach her on the phone. I got in touch with a local minister and asked him to check on her. He did, and he called me back and told me that May had been found wandering on the street, disoriented. She was clutching a small ceramic dog wrapped in a blanket. Turns out that was the child she’d been telling me about. The one she said she’d been caring for. The dog was a present I’d given her for her birthday when I was maybe 12 years old.

“There’s one more thing,” the minister told me, “The dog she was holding, the one she thought was a child. She thought it was you.” I flew to Scotland and found May in a hospital. Her sister and I were able to connect and eventually we got her place in a really nice nursing home, a private room where she ended up living the last ten years of her life. The staff would tell me that May talked about me all the time. Her room was filled with my pictures, little things I’d given her over the years, cards and drawings I’d made for her. One time when I visited, there was a new nurse and she asked me, “Is she your mum?” “Yes.” I said, “Yes, she is.” Watching her decline. Watching all the dreams I’d had of giving her a house or having her live with me when I had kids one day. Watching all that disappear was- it was like nothing I’d ever experienced. It was a different kind of grief. Different than my mom. Different than my dad. My brother. After a time, May stopped speaking words. When I’d visit, she still knew who I was, but she’d open her mouth. And the only sound that came out was a single note, like she was singing. Ahhhh. Ahhhh.

Eventually that stopped as well. I got to see her shortly before she died. By then, she’d retreated deep inside herself. Her eyes were shut, her hands curled tight into balls. I sat with her, holding her, and I thanked her as I had a thousand times over the years. And I told her again what I told her every night before I went to bed and every time I talked to her on the phone, I told her I loved her. May McLinden died February 6, 2014, at the age of 92. Her death didn’t make headlines. The world kept spinning. But for me, on that day, it stopped. Of all the people in my family who I’ve lost, I continue to talk with May the most. When I hold my sons, when I dress them, when I put them in their cribs and it gives them goodnight. It’s her hands holding them. It’s her eyes. I see them through and I can feel her beaming with joy. May McLinden came into my life and showed me what love is, and that is what she has become in me. This is all there is.

My guest today knows all about losing people to dementia. Her name is Kirsten Johnson. She’s a filmmaker. Kirsten’s mom, Katie Jo, died in 2007 after seven year struggle with Alzheimer’s. Now, Kirsten’s father, DIck Johnson, has dementia. I read something Kirsten said about how she believes it’s never too late to get to know someone you love more deeply, even if they’re already gone. And I found that really intriguing. Kirsten is already grieving, anticipating the loss of her father, but she wanted to figure out a way to celebrate his life and get closer to him. And she ended up making a movie with him. This is Kirsten in the film.

So just the idea that I might ever lose this man is too much to bear. He’s my dad. But now it’s upon us. The beginning of his disappearance. And we’re not accepting it. He’s a psychiatrist. I’m a camera person. I suggested we make a movie about him dying. He said yes.

The film is poignant and profound, but it’s also funny and totally unexpected. You can watch it on Netflix. It’s called Dick Johnson Is Dead. Now, I just want to point out her dad is not dead. In fact, we’ll talk with him in this interview, but I’ll explain the film title later. One of the things I heard you say is that the pandemic has opened every human up to the experience of anticipatory grief. And I hadn’t really thought a lot about anticipatory grief, but I think it’s a good term. You said we don’t know how much we’re going to lose and we’re afraid of how much we’re going to lose. And if you love a person with a degenerative disease, you have a great deal of experience with anticipatory grief.

Yeah. So, I mean, I didn’t know the term anticipatory grief before my mom got Alzheimer’s, but it’s this this crazy feeling of imagining the person dead while they’re in front of you and then all the feelings that that brings. There’s a lot of guilt in it. There’s a lot of just confusion in it because it’s almost sort of unbearable. The fact that they’re not quite themselves already and then the fact that it’s going to get worse, it’s like you’re on quicksand or something. In some ways, like I was completely blindsided by the possibility that my mom gets sick and dies. Like what? This isn’t supposed to happen. And then I was double what with my dad. Like, no way. There’s no way he’s getting dementia. There’s no way he’s dying. I’ve done it once. I’m done.

You’ve said that you’re in this strange place and mourning him, who he was. Talking about your father while he’s still alive. Can you talk about that kind of limbo space?

Yeah. Yeah, well, I mean, I would say where I really enjoyed my relationship with my father throughout my life was that he was a person who just, like, met me with respect and curiosity always. Right. So that was something I really loved and needed, you know, because my dad, we could sort of grapple with the difficult stuff of life together. So when he started to get dementia, I was like, I am losing that. And suddenly I was the one who had perspective. And he wasn’t, you know, he had lost his context. And then it was slipping around, right? Like sometimes we really could get into it and have this amazing conversation and then all of a sudden, boom, the sentence would repeat, and I would realize, like, he’d lost the thread. So that kind of limbo, it’s just disorienting. One of the classic stories I tell is him waking up in the middle of the night extremely worried that a patient is downstairs. And I can’t convince him logically that the patient is not there. So then I go downstairs with him. Then what happens? He looks around, he’s like, There’s no patient. And he’s like, Oh, you were right. And then he says, It must be incredibly difficult to watch your father lose his mind.

Wow. Oh. So he’s had the self-awareness of what was happening to him

Yes. That would go in and out. But when it was in, you know, it’s like a knife in your heart.

Your mother did not have that self-awareness.

She- she did not know she was losing her mind.

My name’s Johnson. What’s my first name? I give you a hint? I’m your daughter.

I feel such tenderness for both of us in that moment. Like, I’m just like, Come on, Mom. Like, you got to know who I am. And the look in her eyes. Like she knows she’s being asked that and that she doesn’t know the answer. And then she’s sort of like, you know, tries to search around and be like, you’re a Johnson, right? And it’s like, yeah. But I mean, I’m just in that limbo of like, there’s still got to be some part of you who knows me.

We still need things from our parents, some understanding, some peace of love, whatever it is. There never comes a time when you don’t sort of hope, I think. Unless you’ve had a terrible relationship with the parent, you don’t sort of hope that even in their decline that they can still be there for you.

Mhm. Totally. What I find fascinating is. My mom is so present with me, absolutely. You know, I was riding up here on the bicycle and I was just, like thinking of her and, you know, by some pictures of her. And you’ve said her name and I’ve heard her voice and I’m gesticulating and I can see my mother’s hands making these movements. That thing of me keeping an ongoing relationship with her is part of why I took the opportunity with my dad, because I just felt like, Oh, I get it because of my mom’s death. I get it. That parent is going to stay in my life. On and on and on. They are not ending and it’s revelatory in all kinds of ways.

Your mom’s name was Katie Jo, which I love that name. And this idea, though, that you just said, I think it’s so important and I’d read a quote that you said, which, frankly, when I read this quote, I this is what made me really want to talk to you. You said, even though it doesn’t seem possible, you can always get to know another person differently than you think you can, even if they’re already dead, whether it’s through someone who knew them, finding something they wrote, etc., it’s never too late to get to know someone differently and even more deeply. We let the idea of death trap us, but we don’t have to. I literally sat down and thought about that for a long time when I when I read that and I really hope it’s true.

From my experience, it is absolutely true for me. And a couple of things like hearing that read back to me. One thing that’s missing in that is that we, because we change, we have new capacity to know the person. So, you know, one thing is like age, right? But to go through experience, right? So I am the mother of ten year olds right now. When I am the mother of teenagers, I will again understand my mother differently. And, you know, so that’s something for people who are parents. But then, you know, the experience of. Breaking through some creative obstacle and, you know, doing something really difficult and realizing that was the struggle your mother was in.

So to feel things as a human then allows you to imagine. What is your dad feel in that moment? What did your mom feel to lose her 50 year old husband that has, like, all kinds of new feeling for you when you think about who your mom was and right. And you can only do that now.

It’s so interesting because I hadn’t thought of it until I read that quote and and what you’re saying. But I think part of the reason I’m having so much trouble going through all my mom’s stuff, which is also my dad’s stuff and my brother’s stuff, is that I’m seeing them all through the eyes of the age I was, you know, I’m seeing my dad through the eyes of a ten year old kid and seeing my brother kind of through the, you know, the eyes of a 21 year old. That’s how old I was when he died and sort of seeing it just through that limited lens. It’s hard to kind of let go of things like I just found a box of my dad’s belts, like groovy belts from the seventies that I would never in a million years wear. And I remember him wearing them. But, you know, what do I do with them? My mom would always talk about how over the years, over her life, her relationship with her mother changed and her relationship with her aunt who had custody of her in her teenage years. And she came to see them in different ways as she grew. My mom would replay scenarios she had had with her mother, with her aunt, with other people in her life. And I never quite understood it while she was talking about it. But I, I get it now and I get what you’re saying about it.

You know, I would say in some sense, what you experienced was so acutely painful and bewildering, both for your dad’s death and for your brother’s death, that, like you were in states of shock. And I can imagine that feels like dangerous or impossible to like, approach or shift. And if you look at it too much or get too close to it, that that that crystalline thing might shatter.

Right? Whereas, you know, I mean, I think for me, I was devastated by my mother’s death. I was 41 years old. Right. I hadn’t had children yet. I was furious that it was happening, but it was in some kind of natural order of things. Right. And I had life experience and maturity, so. I could start to play with that set of feelings and who I was at that time and think about it. But there was so much pain in that process that by the time I got to that situation with my dad, I was like, Oh, can’t I do creative play that’s fun, that’s funny, that’s irreverent? So, I mean, I just had I just had like, this vision of, like, you could do tons of things with those belts. You know what I mean? Like, obviously you could photograph those belts, but, like, what if you, like, made some weird thing with them? You know what I mean? Like, what if you played with those belts as opposed to, you know, sort of are entombed by them? Right. Right. But I, I have so much sort of like respect and I would, again, say the word tenderness for that like ten year old child, that 21 year old young man is like, oh, you got nailed. And on a certain level, it’s like, why go near any of that again, is the feeling. But you already have that feeling. That feeling’s not going away. Right. So. So. So that maybe there’s space, which is the space I found with my dad.

You and I did something. Similarly, we both made films about our parents in anticipation of- of their death. I made a documentary with my mom for HBO called Nothing Left Unsaid, and we ended up writing a book also called The Rainbow Comes and Goes. And it was this project to just have a year long conversation talking about all this stuff I had questions about. And I’m so glad I did that and have that. And you decided to make a film about your dad’s decline. So I want to play a little bit of sound from the film Dick Johnson Is Dead, because it gets to something I always find awkward, which has been situations where somebody has died. What do you say?

What can you say when you’ve lost a best friend? Or a mother. Or your best friend and your father. All I know is that Dick Johnson is dead. And all I want to say is long live Dick Johnson.

I know you weren’t speaking in this context, but I love the idea. And I’ve been thinking about this ever since of like what if after one said, you know, I’m so sorry for your loss, which sounds so cliche and I keep coming back to it because I am so sorry for your loss, but I love that idea of saying like, long live Dick Johnson, you know.

Long live Gloria Vanderbilt. Right. I mean, I think you do need permission to say something like that to someone. Right.

Right. I wouldn’t throw it. It’s too startling for a lot of you know.

But on a certain level that change up. Yeah. That like you don’t have permission, but you’re like affirming something who, you know, that’s like, that’s really crazy territory.

You know, in Ukraine famously now, people know this when people greet each other now. One person says, Long live Ukraine. And the response to that is long live the heroes. And it’s somewhat of a controversial phrase because it was used by nationalists during the Second World War. But it is to me, such a powerful exchange that people in Ukraine, in the midst of war, have. It comes to mind when-

-Because there’s something about it that’s so affirming and and also empowering and the passing of strength and determination.

Right. This is what we’re this is what we’re fighting for. Yeah. To be alive and to be not forgotten.

Kirsten’s film Dick Johnson Is Dead, follows her dad as he moves in with her after having to retire as a psychiatrist because of his dementia. It’s a documentary, but it’s also got a series of really funny staged events, and I know this is going to sound weird, but she films her dad getting killed in a bunch of totally unexpected and kind of hilarious ways. In one scene, he’s killed by a falling air conditioner.

Clip from Dick Johnson Is Dead

00:21:16

She kills me multiple times and I come back to life. It’s Groundhog Day all over again. The resurrected dad. The ressurected dad haha.

And I got to say, I. I dreaded watching the movie. I did not want to watch it. I didn’t know anything about you, but I sort of read a synopsis, and I just didn’t get it. I thought, I don’t get this. It’s so I just don’t get this.

Were you offended by the idea?

No, I wasn’t offended. I just did not understand it.

And then I watched it and I loved it. And I loved from the first moment when you killed your father with an air conditioner, which is an odd sentence to say, but I got it. And then to see him get up, I understood then what you were doing, which I didn’t understand before. And then the um I don’t know why I’m-

The scene where you had your dad’s funeral in your family’s church and his loved ones, people who knew him his entire life came and spoke and said what they would say at his funeral, and he was able to watch it while he was still present. I just thought, what a gift to have given your dad and to have given the people in that room and yourself. One woman stood up at the funeral and said, I might have been crying when I wrote it down, so it’s always hard for me to read. She said, As long as my memory lives, the memory of him will live in me.

You know, I was like, I can’t even believe she’s saying this right now. Like, it’s just killing me. I just I mean, is this grief stuff crazy, Anderson? Like, it’s just the way it hits you. Just like the last two days. I’m just, like, all of a sudden, like. Just, like, start crying for no reason. Like, out of the like the way it hits us. Blindsides us. And that feeling. Oh, you have it all the time when someone has dementia because you, like, think, you know it’s happening and then boom. So that mechanism was like, we got to build this into the movie, right? Like, I’m going to blindside you even if you know I’m going to kill my dad, if you know I’m going to kill him with the air conditioner.

Maybe just explain, first of all, the idea behind repeatedly killing your dad.

Yeah, well, I don’t even know if I totally get it, but the impulses behind making this movie sort of came in these weird waves. Like one. I had a dream that this man in the casket sat up and he said, I’m Dick Johnson. I’m not dead yet. So, like, I felt urgency. And then I had this idea about doing the funeral that came out of the blue from that dream of that person sitting up. And then I was just like, Oh, we’re going to make a funny movie. And I didn’t even know where that came from in me. And I was like, I’m going to kill my dad over and over till he really dies for real. And I was you know.

Just to be clear, in the film, it’s not you killing your dad. It’s it’s-

Good point. Good point. I mean, I mean, the idea was that my-

-Father dies accidentally.

In a number of over-the-top ways.

In a number of over the top ways. And honestly, I mean, one of the like painful and crazy things about this is when I had this idea, I really imagine these super over-the-top deaths for him. I literally wanted to put him on an ice floe and float him out into the Arctic. I wanted to catch him on fire. So I was like thinking like these big stunts, like big movie stunts.

I heard you wanted to get Jackie Chan involved.

Oh, my God, I totally you know, I went to Hong Kong. I met this incredible stunt person who knew Jackie. I was, like, working on getting Jackie, but one like the minute we tried to work with, you know, a stunt person, we realized my dad is, like, barely capable of stepping off the sidewalk. I cannot put him on an ice floe by himself. But two finally, it dawned on me, it’s like if he dies, he can come back to life. You know, I come from Seventh Day Adventist people, so I’ve got like the deep Christian myth in me that, like, Jesus got killed and he came back to life.

That’s what I felt. I felt the joy each time he was resurrected. I mean, I there was the shock of the air conditioner falling on him on the street. And then you maintain on the shot and then you see people coming in like taking the plastic air conditioner off and picking him up. And you feel this joy and that when he listens to his own funeral and he hears all the extraordinary things people are saying and through tears, they’re speaking.

Clip from Dick Johnson Is Dead

00:25:55

See you later, Dick.

And then he comes out and he walks down the aisle and people are standing and applauding him. I mean.

What would you ask for? What more can you ask for? And so I was thinking about like how this line between life and death is like you can observe life, you can only imagine death. And then this thought like, oh, cinema, cinema can like do this like wind, rewind play thing where it’s- where we can go to the edge of death and then come back again. So there was this sort of freedom of it’s okay to imagine my father being killed by an air conditioner dropping on his head. He thinks that’s funny.

Well, it’s also okay to, in the midst of sadness and loss, you know, to laugh and to have things which bring joy and happiness and and humor. I laughed so much with my mom in the last two weeks of her life. I’ve said this before. I- by recording her laughing, I discovered for the first time that my ridiculous, girlish giggle is the exact same giggle that she had. And I never knew why I laughed this way. And it was only after hearing the clips again that I realized, Oh my God, that’s my mom’s laugh.

I love that you have the same giggle. You know, my kids and I were recently reminiscing about when we were coming up with stunts for Dick Johnson Is Dead. We would have these crazy conversations at the dinner table sometimes out in public. Me, my kids, my dad is like, how are we going to kill dad? And the kids recently brought up, remember that couple who was eavesdropping on us? It’s just like, who are you people?

That is like, I’m building something with my kids around a new way to be around death that it’s not only something that you have to be respectful, hallowed, grieving, sad. It’s also like grief can also be playfulness. Grief can be invention.

And their name can be spoken without the heaviness of that grief.

Which is hard. I mean, it sometimes takes time.

I want to play another thing you said. It’s about brief moments of joy from the film. Dick Johnson Is Dead.

Clip from Dick Johnson Is Dead

00:28:25

It would be so easy if loving only gave us the beautiful. But what loving demands is that we face the fear of losing each other. That when it gets messy, we hold each other close. And when we can, we defiantly celebrate our brief moments of joy.

That’s probably another reason you made this film, and it’s one of the reasons I did that project with my mom was to collaborate with my kids and my mom, you collaborate with your dad and spend time with them on something that was about them and honoring them and to be with them and also share them with so many other people. It’s like when I walked in the room, one of the first things I said to you is, I love your dad and I feel like I know your dad. And you know that woman who stood up and said, As long as my memory lives, the memory of him will be in me. I now have Dick Johnson in my head, hopefully for as long as I have memory.

Clip from Dick Johnson Is Dead

00:29:31

Yes, yes, yes, yes. And I- I mean, I can’t even tell you. How crazy is that? How crazy is that? That, like, I could transfer Dick Johnson to you makes me so crazy happy. But, you know, when I came in here and we were talking earlier, like I wanted you to tell me about Gordon Parks. Right. And Gordon Parks is-

Gordon Parks, by the way, is a legendary filmmaker, poet, writer, photographer, first African-American photographer for Life magazine, first Black director in Hollywood to make a major Hollywood picture. He directed Shaft. And he was a lifelong friend of my mom’s.

An epic human who I turned to over and over again to help me question understand, think about like, what am I doing with a camera? What does it mean? What does this work mean? Right. And Gordon Parks is so alive for me. We can reach across time and space. You and me. And I can give you Dick Johnson and you can give me Gordon Parks. Right. And I think that’s the thing about being alive. Is that we’re carrying like this multitude of people with us. And some of those people are like ancestors who didn’t get a chance to leave anything behind. No stuff, no creative work. They just survived. But somehow they gave us life, right? And then other people, you know, are literally like your mother’s, like the 20th century. You’re dealing with the entire 20th century in American history. Right? It’s a big deal. It’s a lot there. And then you have all the part of it that’s personal and abstract and your own and private, and you don’t want to share it with anybody. And you’re grappling with, how do I get to be just me and do what I want to do or what, you know, sort of obligation do I have to that legacy?

My legacy is an entirely different one. And I would say, like every human’s equally as rich and full and complicated, and yet there’s less evidence of it.

And, you know, I think in some ways, like, some of this stuff is so emotionally hard that we forget that our creative spirit can, like, find a new way. So I think that’s the thing that I’m advocating here is like invent new games with these people. And, you know, at a certain point, like, we got to live with the living. Right. Like you and I know, like we spent a lot of time on our parents. We spent a lot of time on the dead ones. You know, we should totally call my dad. Yeah, yeah. Okay. Yeah, we should totally call him because he’s still alive. We can call him. Mm hmm. And you know that feeling? It’s like you’re like, I got my phone, the numbers in it, but the person is never going to pick up again.

I think of him I was like, let’s call him.

God, it’s making me teary eyed. Just that thought of like-

Yeah. Yeah. Because I still see my mom’s number in my phone, and it’s- it’s so strange. It’s startling.

Yeah, let’s call him. I got to. I turned off my phone. So we got to.

Here’s the thing. I have no idea what my dad’s going to say, but I’m not afraid of that because I did bottle the essence of Dick Johnson.

Right, you know who my dad is, so even if my dad says something crazy, I’m okay with that.

Good evening. How may help you.

Hey, it’s Kirsten calling.

Oh, my gosh. Kirsten, it said CNN- we were like who knows us from CNN?

Well, I’m actually sitting here with Anderson Cooper talking to him about dad. And so-

Oh really? Oh, my goodness. Oh, um, hello Anderson Cooper, so nice to meet you. I watch CNN all the time.

Oh, that’s so nice, you’re the one. I appreciate it. I- thank you, thank you so much for what you do. You help so many people.

Oh, my goodness. My pleasure. Dr. Johnson you’re not going to believe this.

You know, I am in New York City, and I’m in the CNN building, and I’m here with a great journalist named Anderson Cooper.

You’re having a good time, aren’t you?

I am having a good time. What do you have for dinner, my friend?

Yeah, I know. Did they give you any ice cream?

No ice cream. That’s so wrong.

Right. Right. You got that right, my dear.

We were just saying with Anderson how cool it is to be able to call you.

Yeah, this is pretty good. This is a good connection.

It is. It feels like you’re right here with us, is what it feels like.

You’re in New York City, huh?

Not walking the streets. I’m sitting in a- I’m sitting in a gray room with microphones, and I’m talking to a journalist named Anderson Cooper.

Oh, yeah, I’ve heard of him.

I know. Isn’t that cool? Well, he-

You know what he said about you? He said, I love Dick Johnson.

He did! Yeah. He saw our movie, and he was like, I like that guy.

Yeah. What do you say? Do you say you love me?

I love you so much. I will love you forever and ever. And as you know, you are the best father in the world. So it’s easy to love you.

Thank you, sweetie. I love you dearly.

I love you dearly too. Okay. Bye.

Yeah, but you know what I don’t do? I cannot call every day. Guts me.

It’s really hard. Yeah, because he’ll get on for, like, a minute or two and then, like- he’ll just say over and over, I just want you to know that I love you.

And it’s just like. Like that’s literally, like, the best thing a parent could say to you. And yet, if it’s the only thing a parent is saying to you, it’s just like, okay. Like, my heart is now, like, ripped out of my chest, laying on the table at a certain point, you know? You can’t tap into that every day you know, which I think is our challenge with grief. Right. Like, you circle around it. You- you go back in, you go back out like, you know, and I could it would-

You have to kind of face it when you can face it and put it aside when you need to because you need to a lot.

I mean, if I’m somebody sitting listening to this who has a loved one who they have not sat down and recorded, I would urge them to do this immediately.

Because they’re such- you have no idea the ripple effects of hearing somebody’s voice after they’re gone or your children who aren’t even born yet, how they will feel. And anybody can do that with anybody they love.

They can. But I still would say like a camera or a recording device brings death into the room because it brings the future into the room. So if you were a child saying, I want to sit down with you, my parent, and ask you questions, the implicit thing is because you’re not going to be here someday.

And I think that’s hard. And I think that’s why in so many ways, people get intimidated.

Yeah. For anybody listening who is facing a situation with a parent and dementia or just any kind of loss. Do you have any advice?

You- I mean, it’s not advice. I’m just going to say I’m going to affirm to you, you can make something new with them.

With the person you’ve lost or are losing.

Yeah. Make something new with them. Surprise yourself. So I think, like, that thing of, like trying to keep getting the old thing from a person that you can’t get, like if you’re knocking your head against a wall. Step away, like just turn in a different direction.

Even if they’re already gone.

Even if they’re already gone. I’m asking myself this from- with my mom. Like, what new direction can I go in with my mom right now?

It’s so interesting because my mom, toward the end of her life, told me that toward the end of her life, her relationship with her aunt completely changed. Her aunt was dead. You know, long- decades. But she saw her aunt differently. She saw her aunt through much more sympathetic eyes and was from reading some old letters that I had found in storage that I showed to her. And it’s exactly what you said. It was doing something new with somebody who had been dead for more than 50 years.

Yeah, it’s really- I learned a lot.

Oh, my God. Me too. Is it helpful?

Yeah, it was helpful to me.

And that means so much to me.

I just want to reiterate one of the things that Kirsten said, she talked about not letting death trap us in terms of our relationships with someone who’s died, as she said, that parent or that person is going to stay on in your life. They are not ending and you can still get to know them more deeply. That’s how I feel about my former nanny, May McLinden. I’m getting to know her more now through the feelings I have caring for my kids. And, and that feels good. Long live May McLinden. And that’s all there is for this episode.

Next week, I talk with someone who I’ve always admired, but now that I actually know her, I love her. She’s a remarkable artist, composer, Laurie Anderson, if you don’t know who she is, you should just Google her now because she’s kind of just she’s extraordinary. Her husband is a rock legend, Lou Reed. He died ten years ago, and Laurie and I talk about grief and loss and what she believes happens when someone we love dies.

I think people turn into other things. They turn into music, sometimes they turn into- sometimes a hobby. I think I was mentioning once when I was coming into Prague that I saw oh, Vassilav Havel International Airport and Havel was a friend of ours. And I thought, how did he turn into an airport? Well, people do, they turn into other things. They turn into ideas, they turn into, uh, often into love, you know, of like, wow, I loved my grandma and so much, she was so sweet. And then that love is inside you. So that that’s it. That’s the monument of that person.

All there is with Anderson Cooper is a production of CNN Audio. The Producers are Rachel Cohn, Audrey Horowitz and Charis Satchell. Felicia Patinkin is the Supervising Producer and Megan Marcus is Executive Producer, mixing and sound design by Francisco Monroy. Our technical director is Dan Dzula, artwork designed by Nichole Pesaru and James Andrest. With support from: Charlie Moore, Jessica Ciancimino, Chip Gray Grabow, Steve Kiehl, Anissa Gray, Tameeka Ballance-Kolasny, Lindsay Abrams, Alex McCall and Lisa Namerow.



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Kansas City, Missouri School District considers plan to close 10 schools


With too many buildings and not enough students to fill them, Kansas City Public Schools administrators are considering a plan to close 10 of the district’s schools.The idea behind the Blueprint 2030 plan would be to consolidate resources to give students a better academic and extracurricular experience.The plan would be done in phases over the course of the next several years with two high schools and eight elementary schools closing.”There’s a lot of discomfort in this, and I think it’s discomfort for all parts of the community, even as administrators. This is challenging for us to do,” said Dr. Jennifer Collier, interim KCPS superintendent.One of the first schools scheduled to close under the plan is Central High School. Rebuilt in the 1990s, Central’s building has enough space for 1,200 students. However, currently there are about 400 students enrolled there.Under the proposal, Central would close at the end of the school year. Remaining students would then attend Southeast High School.”I think that is very horrible,” said Da-Nearle Clarke, Central Class of 2011.The Eagles football team is scheduled to play its homecoming game in what could be the team’s last season.”It would be it’d be a tragedy. The Kansas City Chiefs helped build the football field,” said John Robinson, Central Class of 1976.”It’s going to be a tough one. But I don’t want to see this school closed no more than anybody else,” said Pat Clarke, Oak Park Neighborhood Association president.Central has a long history in Kansas City.The school opened in 1884 at 11th and Locust.Construction started at Central’s current location at Linwood and Indiana in 1912.The third and current building at that location was built in the 1990s.Central’s website boasts of “a large, one-acre field house, Greek-style theatre, an Olympic-sized swimming pool and state-of-the-art classrooms.”Additionally, Central’s alumni include Olympic sprinter Muna Lee, baseball Hall-of-Famer Casey Stengel and the legendary Walt Disney.”Yes, Central is a school that is rich in history and tradition. And I’m sure that was disheartening for those who are part of that community and those who are alumni,” Collier said.She also said KCPS consultants said even though Central’s building is one of the newer ones in the school system’s aging inventory, there are some major infrastructure concerns with Central.But Robinson opposes the plan to close the school.”This should be the jewel of the school system right here,” he said.Community input is part of the Blueprint 2030 process.The first time the public will have an opportunity to express opinions will be Monday at Southeast Community Center, 3400 East 63rd Street in Kansas City.The KCPS School Board is expected to make a final decision on Blueprint 2030 in December.

With too many buildings and not enough students to fill them, Kansas City Public Schools administrators are considering a plan to close 10 of the district’s schools.

The idea behind the Blueprint 2030 plan would be to consolidate resources to give students a better academic and extracurricular experience.

The plan would be done in phases over the course of the next several years with two high schools and eight elementary schools closing.

“There’s a lot of discomfort in this, and I think it’s discomfort for all parts of the community, even as administrators. This is challenging for us to do,” said Dr. Jennifer Collier, interim KCPS superintendent.

One of the first schools scheduled to close under the plan is Central High School. Rebuilt in the 1990s, Central’s building has enough space for 1,200 students. However, currently there are about 400 students enrolled there.

Under the proposal, Central would close at the end of the school year. Remaining students would then attend Southeast High School.

“I think that is very horrible,” said Da-Nearle Clarke, Central Class of 2011.

The Eagles football team is scheduled to play its homecoming game in what could be the team’s last season.

“It would be it’d be a tragedy. The Kansas City Chiefs helped build the football field,” said John Robinson, Central Class of 1976.

“It’s going to be a tough one. But I don’t want to see this school closed no more than anybody else,” said Pat Clarke, Oak Park Neighborhood Association president.

Central has a long history in Kansas City.

The school opened in 1884 at 11th and Locust.

Construction started at Central’s current location at Linwood and Indiana in 1912.

The third and current building at that location was built in the 1990s.

Central’s website boasts of “a large, one-acre field house, Greek-style theatre, an Olympic-sized swimming pool and state-of-the-art classrooms.”

Additionally, Central’s alumni include Olympic sprinter Muna Lee, baseball Hall-of-Famer Casey Stengel and the legendary Walt Disney.

“Yes, Central is a school that is rich in history and tradition. And I’m sure that was disheartening for those who are part of that community and those who are alumni,” Collier said.

She also said KCPS consultants said even though Central’s building is one of the newer ones in the school system’s aging inventory, there are some major infrastructure concerns with Central.

But Robinson opposes the plan to close the school.

“This should be the jewel of the school system right here,” he said.

Community input is part of the Blueprint 2030 process.

The first time the public will have an opportunity to express opinions will be Monday at Southeast Community Center, 3400 East 63rd Street in Kansas City.

The KCPS School Board is expected to make a final decision on Blueprint 2030 in December.



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25 Best Halloween Potluck Ideas | Halloween Party Ideas and Recipes : Food Network



Scary-Delicious Potluck Ideas

Halloween is the perfect time to host (or attend!) a potluck dinner. Whether you stick to a theme or contribute something that highlights fall flavors, you’ll find that there are plenty of appetizers, sides and desserts that fit right in. Plus, what could be better than gathering with friends while enjoying some tasty Halloween treats? If you’re looking for some fun Halloween snacks or the perfect dish to pass, you’re in the right place — we’ve got all the recipes you need, starting with these jalapeño poppers. Instead of breading and frying as usual, we use store-bought crescent dough to make the wrappings. Kids and adults alike will love this festive take on a classic. The best part? They can be assembled ahead of time and stored in the refrigerator until ready to serve.

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Mummy Jalapeno Poppers

Cake Eyeballs

Cake pops are perfect for a party, because they’re easy to grab without having to cut a slice out of a whole cake. The best part? No utensils necessary. Try these cute (and a little icky) cake pops that look like eyeballs for your next Halloween party.

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Cake Eyeballs

Chicken Pumpkins

Crispy chicken bites are an easy and delicious dish to bring to a potluck. Perfect as an appetizer, snack or entrée option, these little bites look just like pumpkins, thanks to the celery stem sticking out the top. Serve with ranch dressing for even more flavor.

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Chicken Pumpkins

Spider Web Deviled Eggs

Everybody’s favorite party appetizer gets a scary makeover in this devilled egg recipe. To make the signature spider web design, boil the eggs and then crack the shells. Let them sit in water tinted with black food coloring until cool. Once peeled, the food coloring leaves behind the fun design.

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Spider Web Deviled Eggs

Halloween Crispy Rice Treats

These colorful treats are the perfect thing to bring to your next Halloween party. Crispy, crunchy and sweet, it’s the nostalgic treat you know and love with a festive twist. Extra marshmallows act as the perfect “spider webs” and chocolate-covered peanuts or jelly beans make decorative bugs.

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Halloween Crispy Rice Treats

Pumpkin Cheese Ball

For an easy appetizer that feeds a crowd, try this pumpkin-shaped cheeseball. Ground-up cheese puffs give the cream cheese ball its signature orange color, and a bell pepper stem looks just like it came from a pumpkin. Serve with crackers, chips or crostini.

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Pumpkin Cheese Ball

Witch Finger Breadsticks

There’s nothing creepier than a long, boney witch’s finger pointing straight at you. That’s why we love this easy breadstick recipe — it’s a fun way to add some Halloween flair to an otherwise boring recipe. Shriveled green olives act as creepy fingernails, and marinara is the perfect “bloody” dipping sauce.

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Witch Finger Breadsticks

Cake Pop Brains

Kids love anything that’s ooey gooey, especially during Halloween. That’s why we love these cake pop “brains” made from red velvet cake and ruby chocolate melts. Kids will love to dive into the icky treat, only to find that it’s delicious and rich on the inside.

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Cake Pop Brains

Hot Dog Mummies

Store-bought crescent dough is the secret to this appetizer that’s sure to please a crowd. Everyone loves pigs in a blanket, and this version turns the classic recipe into a festive treat. White American cheese and ketchup are all you need to make little peering eyes.

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Hot Dog Mummies

Halloween Jell-O Shots

Don’t let kids have all the fun — this Halloween, make a special treat for the grown-ups, too. These vodka-spiked Jell-o shots look just like candy corn. They’re even cuter (and more delicious) when topped with some whipped cream and orange sprinkles.

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Halloween Jell-O Shots

Ghostinis with Bloody Murder Sundried Tomato Tapenade

Crostini gets an inventive twist in this seasonal treat, thanks to the magic of cookie cutters. Simply select your favorite Halloween cookie cutter, then cut bread into shapes. Brush with olive oil, season with salt and toast. Serve with sun dried tomato and olive tapenade.

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Ghostinis with Bloody Murder Sundried Tomato Tapenade

Stuffed Mushroom Eyeballs

You won’t be able to take your eyes off this eerie appetizer. Stuffed mushrooms are a party favorite, and these are particularly perfect for Halloween. Mushrooms get packed with garlic-flavored cream cheese then topped with sun dried tomato strips and sliced black olives to make perfectly creepy eyeballs.

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Stuffed Mushroom Eyeballs

Cookies and Scream Graveyard Crunch

This nostalgic and festive treat will remind you of being a kid. The layered dessert features sweet favorites like vanilla sandwich crackers, peanut butter, chocolate wafer cookies and more. Once assembled, it looks just like a haunted graveyard that kids will love to dig into.

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Cookies and Scream Graveyard Crunch

Ghost Hand Pies with Honey Dijon

Hand pies are perfect for a party because they’re easy to grab and don’t require any utensils. This recipe uses homemade pie dough (store-bought is okay, too), cheddar and Dijon for a savory, irresistible treat.

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Ghost Hand Pies with Honey Dijon

Witch Finger Cookies

For an easy and impressive recipe to please everyone at your next Halloween potluck, try these witch finger cookies. A sliced almond acts as the nail and raspberry jam acts as blood to decorate these sweet and crunchy confections.

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Witch Finger Cookies

Meatball Mummies

The only thing that makes meatballs even more yummy? Wrapping them in puff pastry! This recipe is even more fun when you assemble the puff pastry strips to look like little mummies. Make them ahead of time and store in the freezer for an easy Halloween treat.

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Meatball Mummies

Meringue Bones

Though it may look intimidating, this recipe uses only five ingredients and is more simple than you’d think. Meringues are an impressive dessert no matter what shape they’re in, but for Halloween, why not pipe the delicate dessert into a bone shape? Your guests will love the strawberry filling that looks like blood.

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Meringue Bones

Cheesy Pumpkin Puffs

These soft, gooey puffs are stuffed with American, Swiss and cheddar cheeses wrapped around store-bought puffed pastry. Garam masala and ginger add bright, pungent flavor and pumpkin adds a sweet creaminess. A cookie cutter is all you need to make them into tiny pumpkins.

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Cheesy Pumpkin Puffs

Black Magic Cake

This dark, rich dessert is like a blank canvas for Halloween décor. Top it with a candy spider or wrap it with stretched, melted marshmallow to make a spider web. Either way, it’s a delightfully easy dessert to bring to your next potluck party.

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Black Magic Cake

Halloween Deviled Tea Eggs

Deviled eggs are a great party snack, and this version is even more special. Thanks to flavorful additions like soy sauce and black tea leaves, these boiled eggs look like they have a creepy spider web wrapped around them. The orange filling and black sesame topping add to the Halloween theme.

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Halloween Deviled Tea Eggs

Mummy Hand Pies

These mummy hand pies are as easy as, well, pie. Make them in advance and store them in the freezer, then whip them out when it’s time for your Halloween party. The crispy edges and soft, gooey center are hard to resist.

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Mummy Hand Pies

Marshmallow Web Ghost Cake

This impressive cake is just as gorgeous to look at as it is delicious to eat. Sticky, stretchy marshmallows act as realistic spider webs that criss cross around the double layer, multi-colored cake. Finish it off with little ghosts piped out of buttercream frosting.

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Marshmallow Web Ghost Cake

Deviled Ham Eyeball Sandwich

This smoky ham salad gets extra flavor from Dijon mustard, pickled relish, honey and Worcestershire sauce. Pile it on top of white bread cut into circles, then serve with sliced green olives to act as the eyeball. This festive treat it a delicious way to celebrate Halloween.

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Deviled Ham Eyeball Sandwich

Caramel Apple Monster Munch

This yummy party crunch is loaded with fall flavors. An easy snack to whip up in just 25 minutes, it consists of freshly-popped popcorn, crispy apples and sweet and sticky caramel. Be sure to make extra — this irresistible snack won’t last long on your potluck table!

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Caramel Apple Monster Munch

Pumpkin Lovers Lasagna

Lasagna is a guaranteed hit at any dinner party — it’s easy to prep in advance, feeds a crowd and tastes delicious. This version is perfect for fall thanks to the addition of sage, butternut squash and pumpkin puree. Serve it with a crisp salad or enjoy on its own for a filling dinner.

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Pumpkin Lovers Lasagna



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UK blackouts: Facing risk of power cuts this winter Britain is drilling for more oil




London
CNN Business
 — 

The UK government could award oil and gas companies more than 100 new licenses to drill in the North Sea, as it looks for ways to bolster energy security amid a global supply crunch.

Launched Friday, the licensing round won’t lead to new UK production for several years. And when drilling does begin, Britain will still be dependent on energy imports, according to the government, leaving it vulnerable to soaring prices and supply disruptions of the kind that threaten blackouts this winter.

UK utilities company National Grid

(NGG)
warned Thursday that households and businesses could be left without power for up to three hours at a time in a worst-case scenario of very cold weather, low levels of wind, gas shortages and an inability to import electricity from Europe. It said it would take steps to mitigate the risk, including bringing old coal-fired power stations back online if necessary.

Starting November 1, National Grid will also offer financial incentives to customers to reduce power consumption at peak times.

Kathryn Porter, an energy consultant at Watt-Logic, told CNN Business that National Grid was still underestimating the risks to supply, but that blackouts for households were unlikely because it could disconnect large energy users at peak times if necessary.

The latest licensing round won’t improve the immediate supply picture and could face a legal challenge from environmental activists. Greenpeace said that new oil and gas licenses were “potentially unlawful” and that it would be looking for ways to act.

“New oil and gas licenses won’t lower energy bills for struggling families this winter or any winter soon nor provide energy security in the medium term,” Philip Evans, energy transition campaigner for Greenpeace UK, said in a statement.

“New licenses — and more importantly more fossil fuels — solve neither of those problems but will make the climate crisis even worse,” he added.

Analysis by the North Sea Transition Authority (NSTA), the regulator that grants licenses, shows the average time between discovery of oil and gas deposits and first production is close to five years, though that lag is “falling.”

In a statement on Friday, the NSTA said it will prioritize areas in the southern North Sea that can be developed quickly and where gas has already been discovered. Companies have until January 12 to apply for licenses, with permits expected to be issued as soon as the second quarter of 2023.

The NSTA said the licensing round has been subject to a “climate compatibility check” to ensure it aligns with the UK government’s commitment to reach net zero carbon emissions by 2050. It added that producing gas domestically has a much lower carbon footprint than importing it from abroad.

The International Energy Agency said last year that investment in new fossil fuel supply projects, including drilling for oil and gas, must stop immediately if the world is to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius above preindustrial levels.

The UK government set out plans earlier this year to generate 95% of Britain’s electricity from low carbon sources by 2030. The plan, which allows drilling for oil and gas, will also ramp up nuclear power and wind energy.



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19 Halloween Cocktails | Best Drinks for Halloween Parties | Halloween Party Ideas and Recipes : Food Network



Boo-zy Halloween Cocktails

No matter who you’ve invited, it’s not a party until you’ve got a drink in hand. So, whether you’re hosting friends for a cauldron full of punch or planning a pre-trick-or-treating cocktail party (with appetizers!) for all the neighborhood parents, you’ll find that these creepy-cute drinks are just what you’re looking for. So go ahead, spike the punch bowl! One of our favorite Halloween party sips? This version of the classic rickey. It’s refreshing and delicious — just add some gin and you’ve got the perfect after-dark cocktail.

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Blueberry Rickety Eyeball Punch

Witch’s Brew

This cauldron cocktail is perfect for grown-up Halloween parties. Made with just 5 simple ingredients, it’s the perfect choice when you need to whip something up on the fly.

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Witch’s Brew

Poison Apple Punch

Fresh ginger, cinnamon sticks and cloves add so much warm, spicy flavor to this mix of apple cider and whiskey. Fresh citrus zest rounds things out with a bright, natural sweetness.

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Poison Apple Punch

Blood Orange Vampire Punch

Tart cherry and sweet blood orange juices are a great way to balance out mezcal’s characteristic smokiness. The flavors blend so perfectly you’ll want to make this drink year-round.

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Blood Orange Vampire Punch

Black Light Cocktail

Fun fact: tonic glows under a black light (which makes it the perfect addition to any Halloween cocktail). Trisha adds some to her finished drink as well as her ice cubes, for maximum effect.

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Black Light Cocktail

Ghost Cocktails

This spooky cocktail will give you chills but in a good way. Sweet, frosty and just a little boozy, this is a fun start (or ending) to a Halloween gathering. You can omit the vodka for younger ones and double or triple the recipe for a larger group.

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Ghost Cocktails

Pumpkin Sangria

Calling all pumpkin spice fans! This seasonal sangria gets an extra boost of flavor from pumpkin pie spice — mixed with the sugar for the rim of the glasses. Yum!

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Pumpkin Sangria

Hemlock Cocktails

Short on time or ingredients? You only need a handful of things (and about 5 minutes) to mix up some delicious bourbon cocktails.

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Hemlock Cocktails

Bubbling Cauldron Punch

This cauldron may not be filled with slimy toads, bat wings and dragon scales but it sure looks like it! The secret to this delicious potion’s bubbly appearance? Scoops of green tea ice cream!

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Bubbling Cauldron Punch

Dark and Spooky

A mix of rum and ginger beer takes a terrifying turn when you drop a chewy black gummy spider into the glass!

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Claire Robinson’s Dark and Spooky

Berry Eyeball Punch

This punch bowl may look gruesome, but those floating eyeballs are really sweet and delicious lychee fruit — with blueberries tucked inside!

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Berry Eyeball Punch

Zombie Punch

Don’t be surprised if you find your guests lurking around the punch bowl to get another sip; frozen fruit ice cubes keep this punch cold without watering down its flavor.

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Zombie Punch

Candy Corn Cordials

Now you can have your candy corn — and drink it too? Yes! Candy corn-infused vodka is easy and fun to make. Dress it up with orange liqueur and a little fresh lemon juice for perfectly Halloween-hued drinks.

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Candy Corn Cordials

Blood-Red Cherry Punch

Welcome guests young and old with a cup of “blood.” Juice and grenadine give this crowd-pleasing punch its ruby-red color, and ginger ale adds effervescence.

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Blood-Red Cherry Punch

Phoenix Rising Cocktail

This white Russian with a twist uses white chocolate liqueur. Serve it in a goblet fit for a queen’s costume.

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Phoenix Rising Cocktail

Dragon’s Blood Punch

Give your guests a fright with this creepy punch. It gets its ruby hue from a mixture of cranberry juice and fruit punch.

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Dragon’s Blood Punch (non-alcoholic)

Black Cloud Cocktail

The eerie black cloud layer in this drink comes from a splash of black vodka.

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Black Cloud Cocktail

Cider Fall Fireball

Looking for a devilishly delicious twist on sweet apple cider? Add homemade simple syrup infused with warm baking spices like cinnamon, ginger and clove — and fiery, spiced rum!

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Cider Fall Fireball

Halloween Jell-O Shots

Why should kids have all the fun for Halloween? For your holiday table, include treats for grown-ups, like these vodka-spiked Jell-O shots. They’re beautifully layered in a baking dish with colors meant to evoke candy corn and flavors inspired by a creamy orange ice pop. Simply cut them into squares then top with lightly sweetened whipped cream and some orange and black sprinkles.

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Halloween Jell-O Shots



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Thailand’s day care massacre unites families and a country in grief



Uthai Sawan, Thailand
CNN
 — 

Smears of dried blood still stained the wooden floor of a classroom in northern Thailand on Friday, a day after the country’s worst massacre unfolded in perhaps one of the most unlikely places.

At the Child Development Center Uthai Sawan, school bags sat uncollected on colored shelves, and photos of children smiled from the wall, clipped into place with pegs near cardboard cut-outs of ladybirds.

Outside, sobbing parents sat on blue plastic chairs in a makeshift shed, nursing their grief and clinging to each other and their children’s blankets and bottles, any reminder of life, as officials finalized plans for a visit from the country’s top leaders.

More than 20 young children ages 2-5 lost their lives in this classroom during nap time on Thursday when a former policeman armed with a knife and handgun forced his way inside and slashed them in their sleep.

‘I didn’t expect he would also kill the kids’: Nursery teacher describes horror of deadly massacre

In a strange mix of grief and grandeur, at the center’s front door, a red carpet had been rolled out for the delivery of a floral wreath, a gift from the Royal Highness Princess Sirivannavari Nariratana Rajakanya, the King’s youngest daughter.

Later Friday, King Maha Vajiralongkorn and Queen Suthida are due to fly north from the Grand Palace in Bangkok to meet the families of the dead and the six injured, still receiving medical care in Nong Bua Lamphu Hospital.

Their visit will follow that of the country’s prime minister, Prayut Chan-o-cha, who arrived earlier Friday. Prayut met with families at the relief center set up by the government, visited hospitalized survivors and laid flowers outside the day care.

Thailand is accustomed to the underlying tensions that come in a nation governed by leaders of a military coup, but violence of the type perpetrated on Thursday is rare. The last mass death in the southeast Asian country was two years ago, when a former soldier went on a rampage at a military site before targeting shoppers at a mall in Nakhon Ratchasima Province, known as Korat, further south.

In that case, the shooter was said to have erupted after an argument with another soldier over a land-selling commission fee. In this case, the motive is unclear but after terrorizing the childcare center, Panya Kamrab, a 34-year-old former policeman drove home and shot his wife and child, before taking his own life.

Families of victims mourn while waiting for blessings from Buddhist monks on October 7, 2022.

Buddhist monks donate blood for the victims on October 7, 2022 in Nong Bua Lamphu, Thailand.

The total death toll was 36, including Panya’s wife and two-year-old stepson, who normally attended that day care center, but who wasn’t there when the officer came searching for him. The toddler’s death takes the number of children killed to 24.

Drugs may have played a role – officials said Panya had appeared in court that morning on drug possession charges – though blood tests are being carried out to determine if drugs were in his system at the time of the attack.

“Regarding the motivation, the police have not ruled out any possibilities, it could be from personal stress, or a hallucination from drugs, we have ordered a blood test,” Royal Thai Police said in a statement.

The results may give some answers as to why it happened – but they won’t put an end to the inconsolable grief felt throughout this small, close knit community, or solve the question of how to stop it from happening again.

Nopparat Phewdam sat outside the day care center on Friday with other parents, though she lost her brother in the attack. Unlike others there, Nopparat knew the killer. She said he was a frequent customer to her convenience store and often came in with his stepson. “He seemed polite and spoke softly,” she said.

Noppart Phewdam told CNN she lost her brother in the massacre.

Details of the massacre have been slow to emerge, but the accounts given so far describe a man armed to kill, who didn’t hesitate to attack innocent children, and even shot dead a pregnant staff member who was a month away from giving birth.

One staff member said Panya entered the center around noon, while two other staff members were having lunch. They heard sounds “like fire crackers” and saw two colleagues collapse on the floor. “Then he pulled another gun from his waist…I didn’t expect he would also kill the kids,” they said.

Most of the deaths were the result of “stabbing wounds,” local police chief Major General Paisan Luesomboon told CNN. First responders told CNN of the grim scene that awaited them – most injuries were to the head, they said.

In the any community, the loss of 36 people in one atrocity would be keenly felt, but the deaths of so many young children in a small rural area has shaken the village of around 6,300 people.

Distraught families sat side by side outside the center, united in grief, as they waited Friday for details of government support.

This couple lost their four-year-old son in the massacre.

They included the heavily pregnant mother of four-year-old Thawatchai Siphu, also known as Dan, who was too distraught to speak. Dan’s grandmother, Oy Yodkhao, told CNN the family had been excited to welcome a new baby brother.

Now their joy is drowned in loss and disbelief that someone could murder innocent children.

“I couldn’t imagine there would be this kind of people,” said Oy. “I could not imagine he was this cruel to children.”

Also sitting in numb grief were Pimpa Thana and Chalermsilp Kraosai, the parents of talkative twin boys, Weerapat and Worapon, who were yet to celebrate their fourth birthday – with two children, their family had been complete.

Pimpa said her mother had phoned her to tell her there’d been a shooting at the day care center. “At that time I was not aware that my children were dead, my husband kept the news from me. I know it after I returned home.”

Rows of small toddler-sized coffins in white and pale pink were laid on the ground as police retrieved the bodies from the classroom Thursday.

Across the country on Friday, people wore black and flags flew at half-staff at government buildings, as thoughts turned to what lessons could be learned from a massacre within the walls of a classroom.

A Thai officer lays a wreath of flowers from the royal family to mourn those killed at a child care center in the country's north.

Gregory Raymond from Australian National University says he sees parallels between the mass shooting in 2020 and what happened Thursday at the day care center. Both perpetrators had served as officers in a country with a strong policing and military presence.

“These are young men. They appear to have become alienated in some way. And they had access to weapons,” he said.

It’s not known what mental issues Panya had been suffering, though it was believed he had a long-term drug problem – a growing issue in the country’s north, near the border and the Golden Triangle, a global hub for illicit drugs.

Last year, officials seized a record amount of methamphetamine – nearly 172 tons – in East and Southeast Asia in 2021, including the first haul of over 1 billion methamphetamine tablets.

“There’s a lot of manufacturing going on in the Mekong sub region, and there’s also a lot of trafficking through Thailand,” said Raymond. “So all of that means that there’s more people who are developing problems with methamphetamine, and I think that has to be seen as a pretty significant cause of what’s happened here.”

The mix of drugs and mental health issues among the forces is a problem Thailand needs to address, he added.

“Thailand might have to start to think more about how it manages mental health amongst professionals, particularly those who have access to guns, or who have become used to having used to having violence as a kind of tool for their occupation.”



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Big companies keep leaving Chicago. What’s going on?




New York
CNN Business
 — 

Tyson Foods is the latest company closing its Chicago-area offices, joining Boeing, Caterpillar and Citadel among others.

The poultry producer said Wednesday that it’s bringing together its corporate employees at its global headquarters in Arkansas, resulting in the closure of three offices, including downtown Chicago, Downers Grove, Illinois, and Dakota Dunes in South Dakota. Roughly 1,000 employees work in the three offices and will begin relocation in early next year.

“Bringing our talented corporate team members and businesses together under one roof unlocks greater opportunities to share perspectives and ideas, while also enabling us to act quickly to solve problems and provide the innovative products solutions that our customers deserve and value,” said CEO Donnie King in a release.

Tyson’s move serves another blow for Chicago’s image. McDonald’s, which has its headquarters there, criticized the city for crime. CEO Chris Kempczinski recently said that crime is “seeping into every corner of our city” and he said that he’s frequently asked “what’s going on in Chicago?”

“We have violent crime that’s happening in our restaurants … we’re seeing homelessness issues in our restaurants. We’re having drug overdoses that are happening in our restaurants,” he said last month at the Economic Club of Chicago. “So we see in our restaurants, every single day, what’s happening in society at large.”

He said it’s difficult to recruit people to work at the company’s headquarters, noting: “One of the things that I hear from our employees [is] … ‘I’m not sure it’s safe to come downtown.’”

McDonald’s said it’s staying in Chicago, but other companies that are leaving the city have been less forthcoming about their reasons. In an email to CNN, Tyson said the move out of Chicago was not related to crime.

Boeing

(BA)
said in May it was leaving Chicago for Washington, DC, The company didn’t blame crime. Analysts said the change signaled it has lost the commercial race to Airbus and wants to be seen as primarily a defense and space contractor. Boeing

(BA)
used to be based in Seattle from its founding in 1916 to 2001.

Caterpillar and Citadel also recently announced moves out of Chicago to different locations outside Illinois. Caterpillar was based in Deerfield, a suburb of the city.

However, Kellogg said in June that its newly formed cereal and plant-based food companies will be headquartered in Chicago.

Tyson has had a rocky year because of inflation. It recently said that “demand for chicken is extremely strong,” while demand for its higher-priced cuts of beef has softened. Average sales price for chicken grew during its latest quarter, while the average price for beef and pork fell as consumers balked at some premium cuts.

Consumer demand for meat remained strong, Tyson said, but consumers are shifting between meats because of inflation. The company plans to launch new lower-priced options and also add new larger package sizes for consumers searching for value. Shares of Tyson are down about 25% for the year.

Update: This story has been updated to clarify Caterpillar’s headquarters was in a Chicago suburb.

– CNN Business’ Nathaniel Meyersohn contributed to this report.



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