Waukesha parade suspect faces multiple life sentences regardless of motive if convicted


It could be a case to work smarter not harder – giving prosecutors less to prove but the same penalty if they secure a conviction against Waukesha parade suspect Darrell Brooks Jr.

The Milwaukee man is accused of mowing down Waukesha’s Christmas parade. He has a violent past and had made anti-White and anti-Semitic Facebook posts before the social media giant took down his page last week.

But even as Waukesha police quickly ruled out terror as a motive and have spoken little of his social media accounts, Brooks faces a half-dozen possible sentences of life in prison if convicted on six charges of first-degree intentional homicide.

Darrell Brooks, charged with killing five people and injuring nearly 50 after plowing through a Christmas parade with his sport utility vehicle on November 21, appears in Waukesha County Court in Waukesha, Wisconsin, U.S. November 23, 2021.

Darrell Brooks, charged with killing five people and injuring nearly 50 after plowing through a Christmas parade with his sport utility vehicle on November 21, appears in Waukesha County Court in Waukesha, Wisconsin, U.S. November 23, 2021.
(Mark Hoffman/Pool via REUTERS)

WAUKESHA SUSPECT DARRELL BROOKS DODGED JAIL IN DEADBEAT DAD CASE 5 DAYS BEFORE PARADE ATTACK

Those charges are Wisconsin’s equivalent of first-degree murder. And prosecutors could still level dozens of additional charges in connection with the attack, which killed at least six people and injured another 62 during a post-pandemic holiday celebration.

“The best approach to a prosecution of Brooks is to charge him with murder and felony murder counts, in addition to attempted murder, maiming, criminal assault, and other straightforward felonies to account for those who were injured,” said Andy McCarthy, a former federal prosecutor who won convictions against 12 plotters behind the 1993 World Trade Center bombing. 

Hate crime and terror charges unnecessarily give prosecutors more work to do, he said, and could give Brooks’ defense attorneys inadvertent openings.

Five adult victims killed in the Waukesha parade attack. A sixth victim, this one a child, was announced in court Tuesday.

Five adult victims killed in the Waukesha parade attack. A sixth victim, this one a child, was announced in court Tuesday.

“I don’t like ‘hate crimes’ charges because they overcomplicate violent crime prosecutions, sometimes incurably so,” McCarthy said. “That is because they shift the emphasis from what the defendant did to what his motive was for doing it. That can be a trap, especially with a defendant who is likely to raise his mental capacity as a defense.”

Brooks has a lengthy criminal record – a 50-page rap sheet stretching back to 1999 in Wisconsin alone, riddled with violent felonies, domestic abuse and drugs. He’s also served time in Nevada, where he’s a registered sex offender, and in Georgia.

WAUKESHA SUSPECT DARRELL BROOKS GRIPED ABOUT UNFAIR TREATMENT IN JAIL IN HANDWRITTEN LETTER TO COURT OFFICIAL

Court documents exclusively obtained by Fox News Digital Tuesday also indicate he has a history of mental illness and suffers complications from his meds – when he even takes them.

With Brooks already facing life in prison — and an abundance of physical evidence, video and eyewitnesses — prosecutors don’t need to unnecessarily complicate things with terror or hate crime charges, McCarthy said.

Amy Mack lights candles at a memorial at Veteran's Park for the victims of Sunday's deadly Christmas parade crash in Waukesha, Wis., Tuesday, Nov. 23, 2021. On Sunday an SUV plowed into a Christmas parade in suburban Milwaukee, killing multiple people and injuring scores more. (AP Photo/Jeffrey Phelps)

Amy Mack lights candles at a memorial at Veteran’s Park for the victims of Sunday’s deadly Christmas parade crash in Waukesha, Wis., Tuesday, Nov. 23, 2021. On Sunday an SUV plowed into a Christmas parade in suburban Milwaukee, killing multiple people and injuring scores more. (AP Photo/Jeffrey Phelps)
(AP Photo/Jeffrey Phelps)

“Hate crimes are also pointless in this sense: A sentencing judge is always permitted to take any relevant factor into account in imposing sentence,” McCarthy added. “Therefore, if you get a defendant convicted of multiple life counts, the judge may factor in any hate motivation in meting out the term of imprisonment. So the best approach is: make sure you get him convicted by indicting on charges that are easy to prove (here, murder), and then argue hate-motivation at sentencing.”

WAUKESHA CHRISTMAS PARADE SUSPECT DARRELL BROOKS RECEIVED $1K BAIL DESPITE RED-FLAG RATING, COURT DOCS SHOW

As it stands, it’s unclear what would have motivated Brooks to mow down dozens of innocent people, as authorities allege. He’s made no public statements and his lawyers, two public defenders, have declined to comment on the case. And it’s unclear what, if anything, he told police after they arrested him shortly after the parade attack.

A police officer uses a flashlight while looking for evidence in downtown Waukesha, Wis., after an SUV sped through a barricade and slammed into a Christmas parade, injuring multiple people Sunday, Nov. 21, 2021. (AP Photo/Jeffrey Phelps) 

A police officer uses a flashlight while looking for evidence in downtown Waukesha, Wis., after an SUV sped through a barricade and slammed into a Christmas parade, injuring multiple people Sunday, Nov. 21, 2021. (AP Photo/Jeffrey Phelps) 
(AP Photo/Jeffrey Phelps)

“If prosecutors wanted to analogize this atrocity to a terrorist mass-murder attack, better to do that at sentencing, where it’s a good argument, than at trial, where you’d have to prove it beyond a reasonable doubt,” he said.

Brooks allegedly plowed through a crowd on Nov. 21 after fleeing an apparent domestic incident near the parade route, according to authorities.

But as he fled, police on scene stated that it appeared as though he were intentionally swerving into victims. One officer looked into his eyes and said he saw “no emotion on his face,” according to the criminal complaint.

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Just days earlier, he bailed out of the Milwaukee County Jail for just $1,000 and then dodged jail time in nearby Waukesha when an official freed him on his own recognizance and stayed a 120-day jail term for contempt of court and child support payments.

Waukesha District Attorney Susan Opper requested and received a staggering $5 million bail in connection with the parade attack last week.

Fox News’ Stephanie Pagones contributed to this report.



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FDA approves 'glowing tumor' drug to help surgeons identify ovarian cancer cells


Cytalux (pafolacianince), a drug that binds to ovarian cancer tissue and glows when exposed to fluorescent light, has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to help surgeons detect ovarian tumors during surgical procedures in patients.

A Purdue University spokesperson told Fox News that Philip Low, Purdue University’s Presidential Scholar for Drug Discovery, invented the drug. Low described in a press release that when a surgeon turns on the near-infrared light during the surgery, “those lesions light up like stars against a night sky.”

“While many surgeries result in complete resection of all cancer tissue, a substantial fraction unfortunately leave buried or concealed tumor tissue behind, often resulting in recurrence of the cancer and sometimes even death,” Low told Fox News.

EXPERIMENTAL DRUG BOOSTS IMMUNOTHERAPY TREATMENT OF PANCREATIC CANCER IN MICE

He added: “To help prevent the latter outcomes, we have designed a cancer-targeted fluorescent dye that homes specifically to cancer cells that express a folate receptor and causes them to fluoresce brightly upon illumination with near infrared light.”

Low explained that cancer cells require folate, a B vitamin, to divide rapidly, so he invented the drug that tagged a folate compound with a fluorescent dye. The drug is administered intravenously to a patient before surgery.

Washington, D.C., USA- January 13, 2020: FDA Sign at its headquarters in Washington DC. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or USFDA) is a federal agency of the USA.

Washington, D.C., USA- January 13, 2020: FDA Sign at its headquarters in Washington DC. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or USFDA) is a federal agency of the USA.

“Cancer cells have an enormous appetite for this vitamin,” Low said in the release, “and we exploited their greed for folic acid by attaching a fluorescent dye to it.”

Low told Fox News that when the illumination occurs, the surgeon can locate and resect malignant lesions that he or she might otherwise have overlooked during the surgery.

A spokesperson for the University of Pennsylvania Health System told Fox News that while Purdue’s Phil Low synthesized the drug, Researchers at the school were the principal investigators for the Phases 1, 2 and 3 of trials and found promising results. Dr. Sunil Singhal, along with colleagues at the Center for Precision Surgery in the Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania in partnership with On Target Laboratories, led one of the largest clinical trial sites in the country for Cytalux, according to the spokesperson.

FDA TO SCRUTINIZE UNPROVEN CANCER DRUGS AFTER 10-YEAR GAP

“By using a fluorescent dye that binds to cancer cells, making them glow during surgery, surgeons can identify and resect as much of a patient’s tumors as possible and improve prognosis,” Singhal, director of the Center for Precision Surgery at the Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania said in release

In the randomized, multi-center Phase 3 study, 134 adult women who were administered Cytalux intravenously prior to surgery, were evaluated under both fluorescent and normal light. The release stated that in the group, 27% had at least one cancerous lesion detected that was not discovered by standard inspections through sight or touch during surgery.

The university researchers said this new technology provides surgeons with a guide that goes beyond what is seen with the naked eye or touch, especially when the lesions are small, according to the release. They also stated that it will help surgeons remove cancerous tissue in a more precise manner, while sparing the removal of healthy tissue. The newly approved dye also helps detect cancerous lymph nodes.

“Lighting up cancer, which helps to identify lesions that may be difficult to find — especially in the presence of scar tissue or other organ damage — enables more complete identification and surgical removal of cancer that could have otherwise been missed,” Janos L. Tanyi, principal investigator at the University of Pennsylvania’s clinical trial site for Phase 2 and Phase 3 studies, said.

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Tanyi, who is also an associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology in the Perelman School of Medicine at the university also said that this new FDA approval will offer promise for improved outcomes in patients with ovarian cancer, who face a high risk of recurrence after initial treatment.

Scientist prepares protein samples for analysis in a lab at the Institute of Cancer Research in Sutton.

Scientist prepares protein samples for analysis in a lab at the Institute of Cancer Research in Sutton.
(Reuters)

The investigators said in the release that only 20% of ovarian cancers are detected early because it is either asymptomatic or the symptoms mimic common gastrointestinal, bladder or bowel issues. By the time most women receive their diagnosis, the investigators said the disease has advanced, and most patients require surgery to remove tumors along with chemotherapy, according to the report.

Cytalux is the first tumor-targeted fluorescent agent for ovarian cancer approved by the FDA.

On Target Laboratories will release the drug under the brand name Cytalux.



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US-China hypersonic weapons ‘arms race’ is underway, Air Force chief says


The U.S. Air Force affirmed Tuesday that a hypersonic weapons “arms race” is well underway between the United States and China

Secretary Frank Kendall told Reuters, “There is an arms race, not necessarily for increased numbers, but for increased quality.” 

DF-17 Dongfeng medium-range ballistic missiles equipped with a DF-ZF hypersonic glide vehicle, involved in a military parade to mark the 70th anniversary of the Chinese People's Republic. 

DF-17 Dongfeng medium-range ballistic missiles equipped with a DF-ZF hypersonic glide vehicle, involved in a military parade to mark the 70th anniversary of the Chinese People’s Republic. 
(Photo by Zoya RusinovaTASS via Getty Images)

“It’s an arms race that has been going on for quite some time,” he said. “The Chinese have been at it very aggressively.”  

Kendall’s comments came weeks after Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Mark Milley confirmed that China had conducted tests of its hypersonic weapons systems over the summer, likening it to the “Sputnik moment” of the late 1950s when the Soviet Union and the United States were competing in the space race.

TAIWAN SCRAMBLES AIR FORCE FIGHTERS TO WARN OFF 27 CHINESE JETS IN BUFFER ZONE

The Pentagon has held a hypersonic weapons test of its own this year, but with mixed results. A test for an experimental system from the Pacific Spaceport Complex on Kodiak Island in Alaska in October failed because of a problem with the booster system, Reuters reported

A Hypersonic Air-breathing Weapons Concept (HAWC) missile in seen in an artist's conception. 

A Hypersonic Air-breathing Weapons Concept (HAWC) missile in seen in an artist’s conception. 
(Defense/Handout via REUTERS.)

Hypersonic weapons are broadly defined as any vehicle or missile that moves at Mach 5, five times the speed of sound, or around 3,800 miles per hour. 

CHINA CONCERNED ABOUT OMICRON EFFECT ON BEIJING WINTER GAMES

Speaking to Reuters, Kendall admitted the U.S. has focused resources on Iraq and Afghanistan at the expense of developing hypersonic weapons. 

“This isn’t saying we’ve done nothing, but we haven’t done enough,” he said. 

Kendall also admitted that the military’s equipment could use an overhaul.

FILE: The US Navy, in collaboration with the US Army, conducts a static fire test of the first stage of the newly developed 34.5" common hypersonic missile that will be fielded by both services, in Promontory, Utah, U.S., in this handout image taken on October 28, 2021.

FILE: The US Navy, in collaboration with the US Army, conducts a static fire test of the first stage of the newly developed 34.5″ common hypersonic missile that will be fielded by both services, in Promontory, Utah, U.S., in this handout image taken on October 28, 2021.
( )

Fox News has reached out to the U.S. Air Force for further comment and will update this story accordingly. 

Kendall’s remarks reflect a growing effort by Biden administration officials to put more focus on China and Russia after the U.S.’s chaotic withdrawal from Afghanistan in August. 

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In its 2021 Global Posture Review, published Monday, the Pentagon said it was planning major infrastructure improvements at military airfields in Guam and Australia to counter China in the Asia-Pacific region.  

Fox News’ Andrew Mark Miller and Peter Aitken contributed to this report



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Twitter's Jack Dorsey is gone but social media giant's new CEO is worse


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It should not come as a surprise that I am not a fan of Twitter’s Jack Dorsey. He is part of a Big Tech oligarchy that looks down on Americans and our values. They use their vast fortunes and unchecked power to silence voices they disagree with, even as they cozy up to authoritarian regimes across the globe.

Remember when Twitter suspended a Chinese virologist who suggested the virus was man-made? And an article about Hunter Biden from America’s oldest newspaper? And even the president of the United States?

TWITTER CO-FOUNDER JACK DORSEY: HITS & MISSES

But we shouldn’t celebrate Dorsey’s departure because Twitter’s new chief is likely to be even worse.

In an interview last year, Parag Agrawal said Twitter’s “role is not to be bound by the First Amendment.” In fact, he openly acknowledged that Twitter’s role in censorship, saying, we need to “serve a healthy public conversation and our moves are reflective of things that we believe lead to a healthier public conversation.”

FILE PHOTO: Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey testifies before the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on Twitter's algorithms and content monitoring on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., September 5, 2018. 

FILE PHOTO: Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey testifies before the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on Twitter’s algorithms and content monitoring on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., September 5, 2018. 

After Twitter’s board unanimously approved Agrawal’s promotion, Dorsey said the new chief’s “work over the past 10 years has been transformational.” 

TWITTER CEO JACK DORSEY STEPS DOWN — FOUR REFLECTIONS ON HIS DECISION FROM A TECH ENTREPRENEUR

While Dorsey and other founding members of the oligarchy at least tried to pretend they weren’t putting their fingers on the scale, Agrawal is not bashful. In fact, he is remarkably clear about his goals. 

In last year’s interview, he admitted that Twitter is “moving towards how we recommend content.” In other words, Twitter’s new CEO believes the platform is and should be acting as a publisher, which means, according to law, it is no longer eligible for Section 230 protections. 

When lawmakers first wrote Section 230 of the Communications and Decency Act in 1996—the same year the Palm Pilot was introduced to the world and a year before Google was even founded—Congress wanted internet companies to be able to host third-party content and engage in targeted moderation of the worst content without being responsible for what was written by others.

But Agrawal is explicitly saying that Twitter is engaged in sweeping content moderation, curation, and promotion. In that respect, the platform is now acting no differently than traditional publishers such as the New York Times or Wall Street Journal, which generally can be held accountable for false information.

The same should be true for Facebook, YouTube, and others, of course. All violate Section 230, but no regulator or court will take the steps necessary to enforce the law as Congress wrote two decades ago.

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In addition to calling out our Big Tech oligarchy every chance we get, we must clarify the law so Big Tech’s army of lawyers, consultants, and lobbyists cannot wiggle around the rules. That is exactly what my DISCOURSE Act would do.

Under Section 230 as it is written today, Big Tech firms can get away with censoring Americans on the exceedingly vague basis of content being “otherwise objectionable.” My bill would dump that unacceptably vague language and replace it with concrete categories, like “promoting terrorism.”

FILE – Jack Dorsey creator, co-founder, and Chairman of Twitter and co-founder & CEO of Square on stage at the Bitcoin 2021 Convention, a crypto-currency conference held at the Mana Convention Center in Wynwood on June 04, 2021 in Miami, Florida. The crypto conference is expected to draw 50,000 people and runs from Friday, June 4 through June 6th. 

FILE – Jack Dorsey creator, co-founder, and Chairman of Twitter and co-founder & CEO of Square on stage at the Bitcoin 2021 Convention, a crypto-currency conference held at the Mana Convention Center in Wynwood on June 04, 2021 in Miami, Florida. The crypto conference is expected to draw 50,000 people and runs from Friday, June 4 through June 6th. 
(Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Most importantly, my bill would broaden the scope of practices that make a company liable for content on its platform. Specifically, the DISCOURSE Act would remove protections for firms that engage in the following three destructive behaviors: first, manipulating algorithms to target users who have not requested or searched for the content; second, moderating users to promote or censor a specific viewpoint; and third, it would make providers responsible when they engage in information creation and development.

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If a company establishes a pattern of these behaviors, my legislation would make it liable for all of the content on its site.

This is Twitter’s business model, and Parag Agrawal is going to double down. We need to inject long overdue accountability into the Big Tech oligarchy, and Agrawal’s comments are exhibit number one.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM SEN. MARCO RUBIO



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Ghislaine Maxwell was part of Epstein orgies, says first accuser in trial


An alleged victim of Ghislaine Maxwell took the stand this Tuesday to say that Jeffrey Epstein sexually abused her several times when she was as young as 14 years old and that some of the times one or more women participated. 

Questioned about who took part more frequently, “Jane” answered: “Ghislaine Maxwell,” adding that the defendant would also touch her at times, “mainly” her “breasts.”  

When asked by Assistant U.S. Attorney Alison Moe about how the incidents would take place, “Jane” said she would be called to go over to Epstein’s residences, picked up by a chauffeur, and once in his massage room, “Jeffrey would get on the massage table, and it would sort of turn into this orgy.” 

GHISLAINE MAXWELL WAS ‘NO. 2’ IN HIERARCHY OF EPSTEIN’S OPERATION, PILOT TESTIFIES 

Epstein would touch her “everywhere,” she testified choking on her words.  

As a survivor of sexual assault, the woman is testifying under the pseudonym “Jane.” She is one of the “minor victims” in the government’s case and the first of four women to take the stand. “Jane” is a former model, singer and soap opera actress.

In this courtroom sketch, Ghislaine Maxwell sits at the defense table during final stages of jury selection, Monday, Nov. 29, 2021, in New York. Two years after Jeffrey Epstein's suicide behind bars, a jury is set to be picked Monday in New York City to determine a central question in the long-running sex trafficking case: Was his longtime companion, Ghislaine Maxwell, Epstein's puppet or accomplice? 

In this courtroom sketch, Ghislaine Maxwell sits at the defense table during final stages of jury selection, Monday, Nov. 29, 2021, in New York. Two years after Jeffrey Epstein’s suicide behind bars, a jury is set to be picked Monday in New York City to determine a central question in the long-running sex trafficking case: Was his longtime companion, Ghislaine Maxwell, Epstein’s puppet or accomplice? 
((AP Photo/Elizabeth Williams))

“Jane” recalled meeting Maxwell and Epstein in 1994 at the age of 14 at Interlochen Summer Arts Camp, a prestigious arts academy in Michigan. The accuser said her father had recently died from leukemia and that afterwards, the family went into bankruptcy. The pair approached her at camp and realized that she also lived in Palm Beach, Florida. They asked for her mother’s phone number and later would invite them both to Epstein’s Palm Beach house.  

The victim started interacting with the pair by herself on several occasions at Epstein’s residences in Florida, New Mexico and New York throughout several years, including when the victim was between 14 and 16 years old. 

During this time, ‘Jane’ also traveled on Epstein’s private plane to have encounters with him at his different homes, she said. One of those times, in Santa Fe, she remembered being called to go to Epstein’s bedroom.

 “My heart sinking to my stomach,” she blurted with her voice cracking.  

In this courtroom sketch, Lawrence Paul Visoski Jr., who was one of Jeffrey Epstein's pilots, testifies on the witness stand during Ghislaine Maxwell's sex trafficking trial, Monday, Nov. 29, 2021, in New York. 

In this courtroom sketch, Lawrence Paul Visoski Jr., who was one of Jeffrey Epstein’s pilots, testifies on the witness stand during Ghislaine Maxwell’s sex trafficking trial, Monday, Nov. 29, 2021, in New York. 
(AP Photo/Elizabeth Williams)

Per the witness, after being befriended and abused by Maxwell, the defendant once asked her if she had a boyfriend, then telling her: “Once you’ve f—ed them, you can always f— them again because they’ve been grandfathered in.” She recalls not understanding what she meant by the word “grandfathered.”  

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“Jane” is just the second witness to take the stand in Maxwell’s trial. Earlier, Epstein’s longtime pilot, Lawrence Visoski, testified that the defendant was an integral part of the disgraced financier’s life. 

However, Visoski also said he did not witness any sexual abuse, nor saw any unaccompanied underage girls on Epstein’s private jets.  



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Urban Meyer shuts down Notre Dame rumors: 'I’m committed to the Jaguars'


Urban Meyer has made it clear: He will not return to college football.

The Jacksonville Jaguars head coach put an end to any speculation that he could return to the college game following Brian Kelly’s departure from Notre Dame on Monday.

Meyer, who was previously linked to becoming the next head coach of the Fighting Irish, spoke on the vacancy at Notre Dame and reiterated that he’s not a candidate for the opening.

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Jacksonville Jaguars head coach Urban Meyer listens to a question during a practice and media availability by the Jacksonville Jaguars at Chandlers Cross, England, Friday, Oct. 15, 2021. The Jaguars will plat the Miami Dolphins in London on Sunday.

Jacksonville Jaguars head coach Urban Meyer listens to a question during a practice and media availability by the Jacksonville Jaguars at Chandlers Cross, England, Friday, Oct. 15, 2021. The Jaguars will plat the Miami Dolphins in London on Sunday.
(AP Photo/Ian Walton)

“I’m not a candidate,” Meyer said during a conference call on Tuesday. “Obviously, I spent six years of my life there, so great respect for Notre Dame, and as I do USC, UCLA, like we talked about (earlier in the call). But I’m committed to the Jaguars and doing the best we can to turn this thing around.”

After USC fired former head coach Clay Helton back in September, Meyer immediately shut down any speculation that he would become the next coach of the Trojans.

Head coach Urban Meyer of the Jacksonville Jaguars speaks with Trevor Lawrence #16 during the game against the Arizona Cardinals at TIAA Bank Field on September 26, 2021 in Jacksonville, Florida.

Head coach Urban Meyer of the Jacksonville Jaguars speaks with Trevor Lawrence #16 during the game against the Arizona Cardinals at TIAA Bank Field on September 26, 2021 in Jacksonville, Florida.
(Photo by Sam Greenwood/Getty Images)

The Trojans hired Lincoln Riley away from Oklahoma on Monday. Meyer said earlier this season “there’s no chance” he would take the USC job. He insisted he’s in Jacksonville for the long haul.

“I’m here and committed to try to build an organization,” Meyer said at the time.

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Jacksonville Jaguars coach Urban Meyer, left, prepares to lead his team onto the field before an NFL football game against the Houston Texans Sunday, Sept. 12, 2021, in Houston.

Jacksonville Jaguars coach Urban Meyer, left, prepares to lead his team onto the field before an NFL football game against the Houston Texans Sunday, Sept. 12, 2021, in Houston.
(AP Photo/Sam Craft)

Meyer was one of the names mentioned once the Notre Dame position opened up, especially since he spent five years (1996-2000) as receivers coach of the Fighting Irish and even called the head coaching gig at Notre Dame a “dream job” while he was at Florida in 2008.

However, it appears that Meyer is committed to the Jaguars for the foreseeable future.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.



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Sidney Powell fundraising groups under subpoena by federal prosecutors: report


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Federal prosecutors have issued a subpoena demanding, as part of a criminal investigation, the financial records of several fundraising organizations founded by former federal prosecutor and Trump attorney Sidney Powell in the wake of the 2020 presidential election.

The grand jury subpoena was issued by the U.S. attorney’s office for the District of Columbia in September and demanded communications and other documents regarding the fundraising of several groups, including Defending the Republic, according to The Washington Post.

Attorney Sidney Powell speaks during a news conference with Rudy Giuliani, lawyer for U.S. President Donald Trump, about lawsuits contesting the results of the presidential election at the Republican National Committee headquarters in Washington, D.C., on Thursday Nov. 19, 2020. (Photo by Sarah Silbiger for The Washington Post via Getty Images)

Attorney Sidney Powell speaks during a news conference with Rudy Giuliani, lawyer for U.S. President Donald Trump, about lawsuits contesting the results of the presidential election at the Republican National Committee headquarters in Washington, D.C., on Thursday Nov. 19, 2020. (Photo by Sarah Silbiger for The Washington Post via Getty Images)

Defending the Republic, which claims 501(c) 4 nonprofit status, was one of the sites founded by Powell to collect donations after she alleged that the 2020 presidential election was stolen from former President Donald Trump.

TUCKER CARLSON: TIME FOR SIDNEY POWELL TO SHOW US HER EVIDENCE

At the time, the site claimed that “over $500,000 must be raised in the next twenty-four hours for these suits to be filed. Millions more will need to be raised to ensure victory.”

The subpoena was reportedly signed by Assistant U.S. Attorney Molly Gaston, who is also a part of the investigation into the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol. She was involved with the contempt of Congress charges leveled against former Trump adviser Steve Bannon, who refused to appear for a deposition in front of the House Select Committee to Investigate the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. Bannon also failed to hand over requested documents in the face of the committee’s subpoena, according to DOJ.

Sidney Powell, right, speaks next to former Mayor of New York Rudy Giuliani, as members of President Donald Trump's legal team, during a news conference at the Republican National Committee headquarters, Thursday Nov. 19, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Sidney Powell, right, speaks next to former Mayor of New York Rudy Giuliani, as members of President Donald Trump’s legal team, during a news conference at the Republican National Committee headquarters, Thursday Nov. 19, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Howard Kleinhendler, an attorney who represents Defending the Republic, dismissed the claims about the group in a statement to the Post.

“We have always known the more effective we are, the more the false attacks will intensify. Defending the Republic has and will continue to fight for #WeThePeople who make this country work,” Kleinhendler said. “Defending the Republic and the PAC will not be diverted from their missions by lies, innuendo and other distractions. We believe in the law, the Rule of Law, and we intend to follow it and work to reinstate and preserve it.”

Attorney Sidney Powell speaks during a news conference with Rudy Giuliani, lawyer for U.S. President Donald Trump, about lawsuits contesting the results of the presidential election at the Republican National Committee headquarters in Washington, D.C., on Thursday Nov. 19, 2020. (Photo by Sarah Silbiger for The Washington Post via Getty Images)

Attorney Sidney Powell speaks during a news conference with Rudy Giuliani, lawyer for U.S. President Donald Trump, about lawsuits contesting the results of the presidential election at the Republican National Committee headquarters in Washington, D.C., on Thursday Nov. 19, 2020. (Photo by Sarah Silbiger for The Washington Post via Getty Images)

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Powell and others also alleged mass voter fraud related to Dominion Voting Systems, for which she was slapped with a federal defamation lawsuit.



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Federal judge blocks Biden vaccine mandate for health care workers nationwide


A federal judge in Louisiana issued a nationwide preliminary injunction Tuesday against President Biden’s COVID-19 vaccine mandate for health care workers.

Judge Terry A. Doughty in the U.S. District Court Western District of Louisiana ruled in favor of a request from Republican Louisiana Attorney General Jeff Landry to block an emergency regulation issued Nov. 4 by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services that required the COVID shot for nearly every full-time employee, part-time employee, volunteer, and contractor working at a wide range of healthcare facilities receiving Medicaid or Medicaid funding.

Louisiana was joined in the lawsuit by attorneys general in 13 other states.

OSHA SUSPENDS ENFORCEMENT OF COVID-19 VACCINE MANDATE FOR LARGE BUSINESSES

Doughty argued in his ruling that the Biden administration does not have the constitutional authority to go around Congress by issuing such a mandate.

“If the executive branch is allowed to usurp the power of the legislative branch to make laws, two of the three powers conferred by our Constitution would be in the same hands,” he wrote. “If human nature and history teach anything, it is that civil liberties face grave risks when governments proclaim indefinite states of emergency.

“During a pandemic such as this one, it is even more important to safeguard the separation of powers set forth in our Constitution to avoid erosion of our liberties,” he added.

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Landry praised the ruling, saying in a statement: “I applaud Judge Doughty for recognizing that Louisiana is likely to succeed on the merits and for delivering yet another victory for the medical freedom of Americans. While Joe Biden villainizes our healthcare heroes with his ‘jab or job’ edicts, I will continue to stand up to the President’s bully tactics and fight for liberty.”

Doughty’s ruling echoes one from U.S. District Judge Matthew Schelp, who issued a 32-page order on Monday blocking the Biden administration from enforcing their vaccine mandate on health care workers in 10 states.



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Republicans lambaste Schumer over late consideration of NDAA


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Senate Republicans are taking aim at Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., for his late consideration of the 2022 National Defense Authorization Act, arguing the top Democrat’s slow process imperils the troops and national security.

“Let me be clear: Sen. Schumer has put us in this position today. He waited more than two months after we filed the NDAA to bring it to the floor,” Senate Armed Services Committee ranking member Sen. Jim Inhofe, R-Okla., said in remarks on the Senate floor Monday. “I think Americans back home are smart enough to understand that our service members deserve more. They deserve to be our priority in the Senate, and we need to show them that by providing a robust and open debate on the annual defense bill.”

Sen. James Inhofe 

At issue is the 2022 NDAA, a typically bipartisan piece of legislation that Republicans argue has been slowed by Schumer in the Senate. But critical time is ticking away, a senior GOP Senate aide told Fox News Tuesday, noting that “key authorities” expire on Jan. 1.

HAWLEY MOVING TO BLOCK DEM ATTEMPTS TO INCLUDE WOMEN IN MILITARY DRAFT

Some of the provisions that could be in jeopardy if the NDAA is not passed by Jan. 1 include “special pay and hazard pay for troops, authorities our military uses to defend our interests around the world, Impact Aid which supports local school districts, funding for the Armed Forces Retirement Home,” the aide said.

The aide added that although it may seem to the public like a month is enough time to consider the bill, the legislation will still have to go through the House, and differences between the two versions must be ironed out before reaching the critical deadline.

Republicans have also argued that Schumer has refused to allow votes on amendments pushing back on Russia and China, instead attempting to forge ahead to a floor vote without debate over what Republicans consider critical questions.

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Enough Republicans voted against cloture to prevent debate from ending late Monday in an attempt to force consideration of their amendments, a move Schumer called “obstruction.”

“Senate Republicans voted today to block the Senate from advancing the FY2022 Senate National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), despite the fact that the legislation was crafted by Senate Armed Services Chairman Jack Reed (D-RI) and Ranking Member Jim Inhofe (R-OK) and contains 27 Republican-led amendments,” Schumer said in a statement Monday after the failed cloture vote. 

“This latest Republican obstruction comes after Senate Republicans rejected a bipartisan agreement before Thanksgiving from Senators Reed and Inhofe to hold roll call votes on 19 amendments (9 of which are led by Republicans), which would be more roll call votes on amendments to the NDAA in the Senate than the last four years under Leader McConnell combined,” Schumer added.

GOP BLASTS SCHUMER FOR ‘DERELICTION OF DUTY’ AS DEFENSE SPENDING PACKAGE SITS IN SENATE

But Republicans counter that it was Schumer’s delay in bringing the NDAA to consideration that has caused the timing issue, noting that Senate Armed Services Committee advanced the bill July 21, and it was filed Sept. 22.

GOP senators argued that this is the fifth latest in history the Senate has ever begun consideration of the NDAA, a timing issue Schumer himself created.

“The Democratic Leader wants to block the Senate from fully and robustly debating a number of important issues — from how to manage the fallout from the reckless Afghanistan retreat to how to respond to China’s dramatic and destabilizing military modernization to how to restore deterrence against an emboldened Iran,” Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said in a statement Tuesday.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
(AP )

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In his Monday floor speech, Inhofe argued that while it was crucial for the Senate move quickly to pass the NDAA, it was also critical that Schumer allow an un-rushed debate.

“We’ve got to get it done. We can’t rush it, and that is why I will be voting ‘no’ on cloture,” Inhofe said. “That’s not an easy thing for me to do, but I believe we can get this bill in better shape. My vote is against the process — not the bill itself.”

“We’re not delaying national security — no. This is the opposite,” he added. “We are demanding that we show, through open and robust debate, that our men and women in uniform are our priority.”



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Watch the moment a MSNBC anchor repeated an Andrew Cuomo adviser's 'spin' on harassment allegations


Democratic strategist Lis Smith boasted to Andrew Cuomo’s political team that MSNBC anchor Katy Tur was “verbatim” repeating her “spin” on the air about the multiple harassment allegations against him in March.

According to documents released by New York state investigators, Smith texted a group of Cuomo aides on March 3, “I’m texting w/ Katy Tur … Katy is saying my spin live … Like verbatim on cnn [sic].”

Cuomo’s communications chief at the time, Peter Ajemian, texted back a heart emoji and wrote, “Spin is in emails,” while pollster Jeffrey Pollock noted Smith meant to say MSNBC. 

While it’s not clear from the text transcripts what time they were sent, Tur’s MSNBC daytime show that day covered Cuomo’s press conference where he apologized for making women “uncomfortable” but denied touching anyone inappropriately and said he wouldn’t resign. At the time, three women had come forward to accuse him of harassment and inappropriate behavior. 

CNN PRESSED BY LIBERAL ORGANIZATIONS TO FIRE CHRIS CUOMO OVER EXTENSIVE INVOLVEMENT IN BROTHER’S SCANDAL

Tur then relayed a comment to her reporter guest from someone she described as “close to the family”; Smith was a spokeswoman for Cuomo’s 2018 re-election campaign.

NBC News correspondent Katy Tur moderates a panel discussion during the National Women's History Museum's event "The 2018 Mid-Term Elections: A Historic Time for Women" in New York City, U.S. October 3, 2018.

NBC News correspondent Katy Tur moderates a panel discussion during the National Women’s History Museum’s event “The 2018 Mid-Term Elections: A Historic Time for Women” in New York City, U.S. October 3, 2018.
(Darren Ornitz/National Women’s History Museum/Handout via REUTERS)

“I’ve just been talking to somebody who is close to the family and I asked them, given the moment that we have been living in for the past two years, given how everyone has had a reckoning with this MeToo moment, why would somebody like Governor Andrew Cuomo who is a savvy politician not have buttoned things up, not have gotten the message to be careful about what he said around his staffers, around others,” Tur said. “And the person said it’s not that he didn’t think the rules didn’t apply to him, it’s just that’s in the Cuomo DNA. They are extraordinarily friendly, I guess, by nature.”

Tur didn’t appear particularly receptive to the spin, however, sounding rueful and even sighing slightly at the end of her statement, but Cuomo’s people appeared to still be glad that Smith’s language made it on the air.

Smith also discussed her exchange with Tur in her official interview in July with investigators, although she seemed to remember it slightly differently, saying Tur had commented that “friends of Andrew Cuomo say he did — that he did well, was contrite, you know, something like that.”

KAYLEIGH MCENANY RIPS CNN AMID CHRIS CUOMO SCANDAL: HE HAS A ‘LOT TO ANSWER FOR’

Cuomo eventually resigned as more accusers came forward, and Smith was not keen on her involvement with his political operations being widely known according to the newly released documents.

Smith declined Fox News Digital’s request for comment, and Tur didn’t respond to a request for comment.

Lis Smith, Senior Advisor, Communications for Pete Buttigieg, South Bend Mayor and Democratic presidential hopeful, is seen on Buttigieg's campaign bus during a four day tour of Iowa, U.S. September 23, 2019.

Lis Smith, Senior Advisor, Communications for Pete Buttigieg, South Bend Mayor and Democratic presidential hopeful, is seen on Buttigieg’s campaign bus during a four day tour of Iowa, U.S. September 23, 2019.
(REUTERS/Elijah Nouvelage)

The explosive testimony and documents surrounding the sprawling investigation by New York Attorney General Letitia James into now former-Gov. Cuomo have set off a media firestorm, particularly regarding Cuomo’s embattled brother Chris Cuomo. The CNN host was heavily involved in messaging and strategy and used his media sources to look into accusers and even a reporter investigating his brother. His actions went well beyond the impression he gave to viewers as he addressed the awkward situation earlier this year about why he wouldn’t cover his brother’s “troubles.”

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Some of the texts and emails in the investigation have revealed how mainstream media members are used by operatives; one other Smith exchange refers to current CNN reporter, and then-Atlantic writer, Edward Isaac-Dovere, as possibly persuadable to write a story on Cuomo and describes him as “on our side.”



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