Epstein victim challenges the sex offender's non-prosecution agreement: 'The government badly mistreated me'


Lawyers for Courtney Wild, one of many alleged victims of disgraced financier Jeffrey Epstein, filed a petition with the Supreme Court on Tuesday, asking it to rule on whether prosecutors have to confer with victims before arranging a non-prosecution agreement, such as the widely criticized non-prosecution agreement that Epstein struck in 2008. 

Epstein pleaded guilty in 2008 to state charges in Florida of soliciting and procuring a minor for prostitution, allowing him to avoid more serious federal charges that could have resulted in a life sentence. Instead, he served 13 months in a lenient work-release program, made payments to victims, and registered as a sex offender. 

Wild’s lawyers – Bradley Edwards, Jay Howell and Paul Cassell – alleged in Tuesday’s petition that this agreement was struck in secret, which is in violation of victims’ rights under the Crime Victims’ Rights Act. 

“In the case below, a child sex trafficker—Jeffrey Epstein—was able to negotiate a secret, pre-indictment non-prosecution agreement (NPA) with federal prosecutors,” Wild’s attorneys wrote. “Even after the agreement was consummated, Government lawyers did not confer with Epstein’s child sex abuse victims about it and misled them about the agreement’s existence.”

Courtney Wild, one of Jeffrey Epstein's accusers who spoke at his bail hearing, attends a news conference outside federal court, in New York, Monday, July 15, 2019. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

Courtney Wild, one of Jeffrey Epstein’s accusers who spoke at his bail hearing, attends a news conference outside federal court, in New York, Monday, July 15, 2019. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

The Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals expressed sympathy for Wild earlier this year, but ruled that Wild’s rights under the CVRA weren’t violated because the government never filed charges against Epstein. 

Wild’s attorneys are challenging that ruling, saying that the “Justice Department’s practice of covertly and deceptively arranging non-prosecution deals” is illegitimate. 

“The en banc decision leaves the Government free to negotiate secret, pre-indictment non-prosecution agreements without informing crime victims,” Wild’s attorneys wrote in the petition. 

JAIL WHERE JEFFREY EPSTEIN KILLED HIMSELF SHUTTING DOWN ‘AT LEAST TEMPORARILY’

Wild said in Manhattan federal court two years ago that Epstein abused her in Florida when she was as young as 14. 

“The government badly mistreated me and many others,” Wild said Tuesday. I’m counting on our United States Supreme Court to take my case and give me my day in court.”

The Justice Department’s Office of Professional Responsibility investigated Epstein’s 2008 NPA last year and found that former Labor Secretary Alex Acosta, who was the top federal prosecutor in Florida at the time, exercised “poor judgment” during the investigation, but the federal government did not violate victims’ rights. 

“The subjects did not have a clear and unambiguous duty under the CVRA to consult with victims before entering into the NPA because the USAO resolved the Epstein investigation without a federal criminal charge,” the OPR report found. 

The Justice Department did not respond to a request for comment Tuesday. 

Ghislaine Maxwell is set to go to trial in November on charges that she trafficked underage girls for her former boyfriend, Jeffrey Epstein. 

Ghislaine Maxwell is set to go to trial in November on charges that she trafficked underage girls for her former boyfriend, Jeffrey Epstein. 
(Getty Images)

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Ghislaine Maxwell, the British socialite who allegedly recruited teenage girls for Epstein, has unsuccessfully tried to get an indictment against her tossed out on grounds that Epstein’s 2008 NPA also protects her. She is scheduled for trial in November. 

Epstein was arrested in July 2019 on almost identical sex trafficking charges, but died of apparent suicide in a Manhattan jail cell weeks later. 

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 



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Paulina Porizkova shares makeup-free pic, opens up about 'the best compliment' she’s received in 'years'


Paulina Porizkova shared another makeup-free selfie to her Instagram account Tuesday.

Alongside the picture, the 56-year-old model opened up about a recent encounter with a woman who recognized her as the “lady who cries on Instagram.” The woman was seemingly referring to Porizkova’s viral post where she cried about feeling betrayed.

“She thanked me for being honest and sharing painful stuff , because it freed her to do the same,” Porizkova recalled in her caption. “It released her shame of feeling guilty for having a range of emotions, and for not having to pretend.”

“I think it was the best compliment I have gotten in years.”

PAULINA PORIZKOVA SHARES ‘UNRETOUCHED’ PICTURE OF HERSELF POSING NUDE FOR MAGAZINE SHOOT

The 56-year-old model opened up about a recent encounter with a woman who recognized her as the 'lady who cries on Instagram.'

The 56-year-old model opened up about a recent encounter with a woman who recognized her as the ‘lady who cries on Instagram.’
(Theo Wargo/Getty Images)

Porizkova then added hashtags such as, “#truthisnotalwayspretty,” “nofillers,” “nobotox” and “nofilter,” but emphasized she wasn’t trying to shame anyone.

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“The reason I put in these hashtags is NOT to shame women who have had work done!” the model wrote. “Merely to let those who haven’t and those are aren’t sure if they should – see a face that’s resolutely without. Because untouched faces in the public eye are fewer and further between.”

The former Sports Illustrated swimsuit model has been open about plastic surgery, which outside of collagen-enhancing laser treatments, she’s avoided thus far.

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“It’s so easy to be judgmental when you’re 30,” she previously told Los Angeles Magazine. “But now I don’t blame anybody for wanting to look younger. I understand doing a bit of botox, a little bit of filler, to feel good about yourself because looking younger is more accepted by society. But, really, the way to fix [society’s attitudes about aging] isn’t to try to look younger—it’s to get the world to embrace older people the way we are.”



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NYC wants schools to rethink honor rolls deemed ‘detrimental’ to students not making grade


They’re remaking the grade.

The city Department of Education wants schools to rethink honor rolls and class rankings because they’re “detrimental” to some kids, according to new grading guidance.

“Recognizing student excellence via honor rolls and class rank can be detrimental to learners who find it more difficult to reach academic success, often for reasons beyond their control,” the document states.

The DOE wants schools to widen recognition to include “contributions to the school or wider community, and demonstrations of social justice and integrity.”

That advisory is part of a larger set of grading imperatives that seek to entrench and further a new concept of student assessment.

“Grades are not only a reflection of student performance but can be self-fulfilling prophecies,” the document states. “Influencing future student performance either directly through their psychological impact or indirectly through instructional decisions, placement in courses, and guidance in post-secondary options.”

The DOE wants more emphasis on evidence of progress and the mastery of individual “learning goals” rather than the cumulative quality of assignments and tests.

DE BLASIO: ALL NYC SCHOOLS WILL BE 100% IN-PERSON IN SEPTEMBER, MASKS STILL REQUIRED

If a new exam score shows improvement, the DOE advises teachers to disregard or lessen the influence of the prior showing.

“Rather than just averaging the two assessments, replacing the score or part of the score is a more valid measurement of student achievement,” the guidance states.

The DOE said overall performance is taken into account.

“We have the highest academic standards for our kids,” said spokesperson Sarah Casasnovas. “Our grading policy mirrors pre-pandemic expectations, and as always student grades are first and foremost based on academic progress and performance.”

Parent leader Rasheedah Brown Harris applauded the approach.

“We can’t neglect that folks are going through a lot,” she said. “We’re talking about learning loss when people are trying to survive. We want to make sure that they are learning the overall concepts. We can’t get too concerned with the nitty-gritty of testing and grades.”

Deborah Alexander, of Community Education Council 30 in Queens, worried that lessening the impact of work throughout the year could de-incentivize performance.

“What are we telling them?’ she asked. “That the process isn’t important as long as you get the material at the end.”

COVID-19 VACCINE MANDATED IN NEW YORK: HERE’S WHAT RESIDENTS ARE SAYING

The guidance also reiterated that “non-mastery” measures like behavior, attendance, and participation should not impact grades.

Given pandemic disruptions, the DOE said these categories are often impacted by personal circumstances not under the control of students.

Staffers should “minimize the effects of bias and eliminate practices that penalize students who have been marginalized based on their race, culture, language and/or ability.”

The DOE also wants teachers to cede some authority over learning goals and proficiency markers to students and parents.

Educators are advised to “invite students and families to offer meaningful input and engage in decision making about how students will learn and demonstrate proficiency on course goals and co-create learning goals with teachers.”

While she said she supported collaboration, Alexander said the DOE’s concept undermines their professional authority.

“We send our kids to schools to benefit from the value of teachers and their expertise,” she said.

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Brooklyn College and CUNY Grad Center education professor David Bloomfield said he backed the spirit of the new guidance in light of ongoing coronavirus upheaval.

“We’re all trying to figure out what to do about grades,” he said. “There is no way to know what mayhem is going on to promote or inhibit performance.”



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Texas Senate passes GOP-backed election bill weeks after Dem walkout


The Texas legislature passed the final version of a GOP-backed bill that aims to protect elections and promote election integrity, sending the legislation to Gov. Greg Abbott‘s desk to be signed.

Senate Bill 1 (SB1) was approved by the state House last week in a vote of 80 to 41, with one Republican in opposition. The state Senate followed Tuesday with a party-line vote of 18 to 13.

“Protecting the integrity of our elections is critical in the state of Texas, which is why I made election integrity an emergency item during the 87th Legislative Session,” Abbott said in a statement following passage. “I thank Senator Brian Hughes, Representative Andrew Murr, Lieutenant Governor Dan Patrick, and Speaker Dade Phelan for stepping up to ensure that this bill made it to the finish line during the second special session.”

HOUSE REPUBLICANS INTRODUCE BILL TO REPEAL ‘MOTOR VOTER’ LAW OVER FRAUD FEARS

According to Gov. Abbott, the legislation makes it “easier to vote and harder to cheat” in the Lone Star State.

“Senate Bill 1 will solidify trust and confidence in the outcome of our elections by making it easier to vote and harder to cheat,” Abbott added. “I look forward to signing Senate Bill 1 into law, ensuring election integrity in Texas.”

The bill, as noted by Abbott, creates uniform statewide voting hours, maintains and expands voting access for registered voters who need assistance, prohibits drive-through voting, and enhances transparency by authorizing poll watchers to observe more aspects of the election process.

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In addition, SB1 also bans the distribution of unsolicited applications for mail-in ballots and gives voters with a defective mail-in ballot the opportunity to correct the defect.

The passage of SB1 comes after more than 50 Texas Democrats fled the state and flew to Washington, D.C., in July to pressure Congress about voting rights, preventing the state measure from passing.



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Sister of Ohio Navy Corpsman killed in Kabul attack says brother’s death left ‘hole that will never be filled’


For Berlin Heights, an Ohio town of fewer than 1,000 people, last week’s terrorist attack in Kabul that killed 13 U.S. service members and 169 Afghans hit close to home. 

One of those service members killed was 22-year-old Navy Corpsman Maxton “Max” Soviak, a Berlin Heights native and 2017 graduate of the town’s Edison High School. 

Max Soviak

The Navy said Soviak enlisted on Sept. 26, 2017, and graduated from Recruit Training Command in Great Lakes Illinois before being assigned to 1st Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division in September 2020. 

PENTAGON WILL LAUNCH DRONE STRIKES IN AFGHANISTAN ‘IF AND WHEN WE NEED TO,’ SPOKESMAN SAYS

In a heart-wrenching Instagram post, Soviak’s sister, Marilyn, wrote that her brother was a medic who was in Afghanistan to help people and that his death has irreversibly changed her family. 

“My beautiful, intelligent, beat-to-the-sound of his own drum, annoying, charming baby brother was killed yesterday helping to save lives,” Marilyn wrote. “There is a large Maxton sized hole that will never be filled. 

Navy Corpsman Max Soviak was killed in Kabul after a suicide bombing struck near the airport on August, 27,2021.

Navy Corpsman Max Soviak was killed in Kabul after a suicide bombing struck near the airport on August, 27,2021.
(Facebook/ Max Soviak)

“He was just a kid. We are sending kids over there to die. Kids with families that now have holes just like ours. I’m not one for praying but damn could those kids over there use some right now. My heart is in pieces and I don’t think that’ll ever fit back again.” 

The Navy issued a statement, describing Soviak as “a wonderful son who loved his family, his community, and was proud to serve in the U.S. Navy. 

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“He was excited about the opportunities the Navy would offer him and planned to make the Navy a career. We are incredibly proud of his service to our country.” 



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Bonnaroo 2021 canceled due to heavy rain from Hurricane Ida


Bonnaroo 2021 has been officially canceled.

The festival, which takes place in Tennessee, announced the news on social media, citing the “waterlogged” festival grounds 

“We are absolutely heartbroken to announce that we must cancel Bonnaroo. While this weekend’s weather looks outstanding, currently Centeroo is waterlogged in many areas, the ground is incredibly saturated on our tollbooth paths, and the campgrounds are flooded to the point that we are unable to drive in or park vehicles safely,” the statement read.

“We have done everything in our power to try to keep the show moving forward, but Mother Nature has dealt us a tremendous amount of rain over the past 24 hours, and we have run out of options to try to make the event happen safely and in a way that lives up to the Bonnaroo experience,” the statement continued.

TENNESSEE OFFICIALS SAY DAMAGE FROM FLOODS IS WORSE THAN PREVIOUSLY THOUGHT, BIDEN APPROVES DISASTER DECLARATION

A general view of atmosphere during the Umphrey's McGee performance at the Bonnaroo Music & Arts Festival on June 13, 2014 in Manchester, Tennessee.

A general view of atmosphere during the Umphrey’s McGee performance at the Bonnaroo Music & Arts Festival on June 13, 2014 in Manchester, Tennessee.
(Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images)

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The annual festival was scheduled to start Thursday on the site of a former farm in Manchester, about an hour southeast of Nashville. This is the second year in a row the music festival has been canceled. The 2020 festival was called off due to the coronavirus pandemic.

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Artists who were supposed to perform this weekend included Lizzo, the Foo Fighters, Tame Impala, Megan Thee Stallion, Phoebe Bridgers, Tyler, the Creator and Jason Isbell.

The Associated Press contributed to this report



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Mets' Báez bolts out of dog house with apology, winning run


Javier Báez apologized for running his mouth, then sprinted right back into the good graces of Mets fans.

Báez bolted from first to home for the winning run in the ninth inning of a 6-5 win over the Miami Marlins on Tuesday, hours after he and Francisco Lindor apologized for their roles in a thumbs-down gesture that was in part a dig at New York fans who have booed the underperforming ballclub.

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Báez and Lindor took turns saying they were sorry within an hour of the first pitch. Their regrets followed a stern statement from team president Sandy Alderson on Sunday night disavowing the gesture, as well as a team meeting Tuesday in which players said they would stop making it.

“I didn’t mean to offend anybody,” Báez said.

Lindor added, “It doesn’t look good on our part.”

The longtime friends spoke to reporters in front of the Mets’ dugout. Lindor was booed by a few fans when he emerged, and two young boys held up thumbs-down signals behind him while he spoke. After Báez concluded his apology, one fan shouted to him, “Javy, we just want to win, bro!”

Lindor drew some boos during his first at-bat of the game, which was the resumption of an April matchup suspended by rain in the first inning.

But Báez got a much ruder welcome when he entered as a pinch-hitter in the eighth inning. Many in the sparse crowd stood and turned down their thumbs while he batted, jeering him until he was hit by a 2-2 pitch on the shin and walked to first.

Báez batted again in the ninth, and the tone shifted. Fans chanted “Javy Báez!” as he stood in with two on, two out and New York trailing 5-3. Báez beat out an infield single, earning an ovation after trimming the lead to 5-4.

Báez then dashed home on Michael Conforto’s single to left field. He was mobbed at home plate by a group of teammates, including Lindor. They shared a long hug moments later.

The 28-year-old Báez was acquired from the Chicago Cubs on July 30 and had hit .210 with four homers and a .709 OPS in 17 games before Tuesday. Mets fans booed the two-time All-Star and others throughout August, when the team has gone 8-19 — Tuesday’s early result counts toward April — to fall out of playoff position after leading the NL East for nearly three months.

Players began making the thumbs-down gesture toward their dugout after base hits and other positive plays while at Dodger Stadium from Aug. 20-22.

“When we don’t get success, we’re going to get booed,” Báez explained Sunday. “So they’re going to get booed when we have success.”

Lindor and manager Luis Rojas said Tuesday they believe Báez — whose first language is Spanish but doesn’t use an interpreter when speaking to media — misspoke when he said Mets players were booing the fans.

“I didn’t say the fans are bad, I love the fans, but like, I just felt like we were alone,” Báez said Tuesday. “The fans obviously want to win, and they pay our salary like everybody says, but like, we want to win, too, and the frustration got to us. And, you know, I didn’t mean to offend anybody, and if I offend anybody, we apologize.”

Lindor also said the gesture was not explicitly about fans.

“Thumbs down for me means adversity, the adversity we have gone through in this whole time,” Lindor said. “Like the negative things, we overcome it, so it’s like, ‘We did it! We went over it!’

“However, it was wrong, and I apologize to whoever I offended. It was not my intent to offend people.”

First-year Mets owner Steve Cohen tweeted that he was “glad to hear our players apologizing to the fans” and asked supporters to “get behind our players today.”

The Mets aren’t the only club taking exception to home-cooked ridicule. Pirates outfielder Gregory Polanco complained last week about booing from fans in Pittsburgh a couple of days before being released by the team.

“They have to understand that I’m a human being, too,” he said.

Of course, New York is its own beast. Players and coaches expect that underperforming stars in the Big Apple will hear about it from fans.

“Here, I have a lot of respect,” Lindor said. “People are very honest and they let you know.”

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Mets fan Will Gregory, 15, said before the game that he wished Báez handled the boos with as much grace as Yankees slugger Giancarlo Stanton. Gregory — standing with friends near the players’ entrance seeking autographs — said he respected Stanton for acknowledging the fans’ right to boo.

“He took it a lot differently, saying that, ‘We need to be better,’” Gregory said. “But you know, we’re New Yorkers, and that’s how (Báez) is going to be received if he plays bad. So, if he doesn’t want to get booed, he should just play better.”

Rojas said he didn’t know the meaning of the thumbs-down gesture until Báez’s comments Sunday.

“We’re being accountable for some of those decisions and that’s what I see in this group,” the manager said. “This is a group of guys that I think is accountable for their actions.

“We have leaders in there that have explained how the media, the fans, everything is here,” he added. “And myself, I have always told the guys how accountable we’ve got to be.”

A four-time All-Star, Lindor was acquired from Cleveland over the offseason in the first major move for the team since Cohen purchased the franchise. Lindor signed a $341 million, 10-year deal to remain in New York, but he has been jeered often during a season in which he is hitting .224 with 11 homers and a .686 OPS.

He was hopeful the gesture wouldn’t spoil his relationship with the fan base he is committed to through 2031.

“I hope this doesn’t stick around because it wasn’t meant to offend anybody, to disrespect nobody,” he said. “This is just a time of trying to pick each other up. We’re going through a rough time, and it was a gesture to pick each other up.”



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NYC lightpole outside Fox News headquarters swarmed by bees


Midtown Manhattan was buzzing Tuesday when a large colony of bees gathered around a light pole, prompting onlookers to stop in amazement, at a distance of course. 

The bees were seen gathering around the pole on 46th Street and the Avenue of the Americas, also known as 6th Avenue. 

Onlookers gather Tuesday to watch a large colony of bees gather around a light pole in midtown Manhattan.

Onlookers gather Tuesday to watch a large colony of bees gather around a light pole in midtown Manhattan.
(Fox News)

Coincidently, the gathering spot is right outside Fox News headquarters. 

The New York Police Department told Fox News it was sending a beekeeper to the area to vacuum up the bees.

They said no injuries or car accidents related to the bee invasion were reported. Authorities were not sure why the bees chose the busy spot to form a colony but there was no threat of an invasion, they said. 

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In July, an NYPD beekeeper removed 10,000 bees from Times Square. He came back two weeks later to the same area and removed a smaller swarm. 



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Hardaway: NIL rules help him recruit top class at Memphis


Penny Hardaway believes the new name, image and likeness rules helped him land another top recruiting class at Memphis.

Hardaway said Tuesday the NIL rules helped ease the strain on players weighing their options between earning money by going to the NBA’s G League or going to college. Now Hardaway can add NIL options when aggressively pitching himself, his staff and what he’s building at his alma mater.

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“You can come to college now and and get deals for yourself and learn and develop at the same time,” Hardaway said. “You don’t have to go to any other level to get that.”

Hardaway, who had his first No. 1 recruiting class in 2019, lost five-star guard Jalen Green to the G League in 2020 after the first-round NBA pick was lured by money and endorsement opportunities. Hardaway made clear he disagreed with how the G League was approaching potential one-and-done players.

Thanks to the new NIL rules, that wasn’t a problem this offseason.

Hardaway convinced former NBA coach Larry Brown to Memphis to join his coaching staff, then hired a 16-year NBA veteran and champion Rasheed Wallace.

He also finalized a recruiting class led by a pair of five-star recruits in Emoji Bates and Jalen Duren, two players who reclassified from 2022 to 2021, to earn his second No. 1 recruiting class at the American Athletic Conference program.

Hardaway’s sidekick Lil’ Penny from his Nike shoe commercials during his playing days also pitched in. Lil’ Penny made an appearance in photos Bates posted on social media during his official visit to Memphis when he posed in a Tigers’ uniform.

The Michigan native originally committed to Tom Izzo and Michigan State last year before changing his mind. The 6-foot-8 guard has been called a generational talent and projected to be the No. 1 overall pick when he’s eligible for the NBA draft in 2023 after turning 19.

He considered Oregon and the G League before committing to Memphis and Hardaway.

Hardaway joked the photo and coming out of retirement was Lil Penny’s idea.

“It’s a part of who I am, it’s a part of that what we do and how I made my name in the industry, in the NBA and with marketing and things of that nature and having Lil Penny here is self-explanatory,” Hardaway said. “It’s a part of my history. And it’s also funny as well.”

In the end, Hardaway believes the basketball side won over Bates and Duren even though Memphis hasn’t reached the NCAA Tournament since 2014. Memphis returns three of its top five scorers from the team that won the NIT championship last spring.

“They really knew what they wanted out of this basketball thing,” Hardaway said. “And the development, the teaching and understanding, being around brilliant minds on the staff is what they really wanted.”

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Wallace is eager to help the Tigers get whatever money they can earn through the NIL rules. He said former NBA players helped pave the way for him to make what he was paid once he arrived in the league.

“Now we paved the way for this generation to receive the dollars that they get,” Wallace said. “So it’s it just all goes hand in hand. So I want to see my young guys get that money so I can’t take this knowledge to the grave with me. And it’ll be an injustice to the basketball world and to the basketball gods if I did.”



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Epstein victim challenges the sex offender's non-prosecution agreement: 'The government badly mistreated me'


Lawyers for Courtney Wild, one of many alleged victims of disgraced financier Jeffrey Epstein, filed a petition with the Supreme Court on Tuesday, asking it to rule on whether prosecutors have to confer with victims before arranging a non-prosecution agreement, such as the widely criticized non-prosecution agreement that Epstein struck in 2008. 

Epstein pleaded guilty in 2008 to state charges in Florida of soliciting and procuring a minor for prostitution, allowing him to avoid more serious federal charges that could have resulted in a life sentence. Instead, he served 13 months in a lenient work-release program, made payments to victims, and registered as a sex offender. 

Wild’s lawyers – Bradley Edwards, Jay Howell and Paul Cassell – alleged in Tuesday’s petition that this agreement was struck in secret, which is in violation of victims’ rights under the Crime Victims’ Rights Act. 

“In the case below, a child sex trafficker—Jeffrey Epstein—was able to negotiate a secret, pre-indictment non-prosecution agreement (NPA) with federal prosecutors,” Wild’s attorneys wrote. “Even after the agreement was consummated, Government lawyers did not confer with Epstein’s child sex abuse victims about it and misled them about the agreement’s existence.”

Courtney Wild, one of Jeffrey Epstein's accusers who spoke at his bail hearing, attends a news conference outside federal court, in New York, Monday, July 15, 2019. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

Courtney Wild, one of Jeffrey Epstein’s accusers who spoke at his bail hearing, attends a news conference outside federal court, in New York, Monday, July 15, 2019. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

The Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals expressed sympathy for Wild earlier this year, but ruled that Wild’s rights under the CVRA weren’t violated because the government never filed charges against Epstein. 

Wild’s attorneys are challenging that ruling, saying that the “Justice Department’s practice of covertly and deceptively arranging non-prosecution deals” is illegitimate. 

“The en banc decision leaves the Government free to negotiate secret, pre-indictment non-prosecution agreements without informing crime victims,” Wild’s attorneys wrote in the petition. 

JAIL WHERE JEFFREY EPSTEIN KILLED HIMSELF SHUTTING DOWN ‘AT LEAST TEMPORARILY’

Wild said in Manhattan federal court two years ago that Epstein abused her in Florida when she was as young as 14. 

“The government badly mistreated me and many others,” Wild said Tuesday. I’m counting on our United States Supreme Court to take my case and give me my day in court.”

The Justice Department’s Office of Professional Responsibility investigated Epstein’s 2008 NPA last year and found that former Labor Secretary Alex Acosta, who was the top federal prosecutor in Florida at the time, exercised “poor judgment” during the investigation, but the federal government did not violate victims’ rights. 

“The subjects did not have a clear and unambiguous duty under the CVRA to consult with victims before entering into the NPA because the USAO resolved the Epstein investigation without a federal criminal charge,” the OPR report found. 

The Justice Department did not respond to a request for comment Tuesday. 

Ghislaine Maxwell is set to go to trial in November on charges that she trafficked underage girls for her former boyfriend, Jeffrey Epstein. 

Ghislaine Maxwell is set to go to trial in November on charges that she trafficked underage girls for her former boyfriend, Jeffrey Epstein. 
(Getty Images)

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Ghislaine Maxwell, the British socialite who allegedly recruited teenage girls for Epstein, has unsuccessfully tried to get an indictment against her tossed out on grounds that Epstein’s 2008 NPA also protects her. She is scheduled for trial in November. 

Epstein was arrested in July 2019 on almost identical sex trafficking charges, but died of apparent suicide in a Manhattan jail cell weeks later. 

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 



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